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  1. Hello everyone The last year has been an unusual period of time for the staff team and we are getting closer to another milestone — launching our community on the GTA V platform. In preparation for the many months of developing the script we altered the way our team is structured by introducing the 'Insider' team. The whole staff team has played a vital role in establishing the ecosystem and building the foundation for the server, without their knowledge and experience we would not have been where we are today. As of this post, the Insider Team will be removed and some members of it will be offered alternative positions within the core staff team based on contributions and activity during their time. We'd also like to thank Ten for his contributions to the Faction Team and for setting up and shaping the illegal faction scene ahead of the launch of the server, sadly he has resigned from the team a few days ago and we look forward to hopefully seeing him return in the future! We'd like to say a massive thank you to everyone who has contributed to shape the server — the community, the insiders and the staff team as a whole. Thank you for sticking with us through the most challenging period of LS-RP history. Moving on, we'd like to introduce our new staff team structure: Senior Lead Admin Baker — DadoJ — Kane Lead Admin nova Senior Admin DDaniels — Mitcholodolo — Redz Game Admin Xanakin — zalenac — ROZE — Benavides — Mario — Flemwad — Dos Santos Junior Admin Bellagio — Birdman — Zapper Trainee Admins accursed — Kendrick — Genny — jack — luca. Senior Tester betonists — danielswe — Turtle — Marshall Tester Bizarre — bobster — Caleb410 Junior Tester Farrell — Mac — AlmightyBounter — JamesW — Freedom Fighter — Faugh A Ballagh This list is not final and is subject to change.
    21 points
  2. Hello, As of this moment, registrations and character applications are open for everyone for up to three characters. Head over to https://ucp.ls-rp.com/ and create a character. The character creation server remains locked for our Patreon supporters until the 20th of February, when it becomes available for everyone. Please be patient with us tonight in case there's any issues — we'll try to iron them out as soon as we can. Also, everyone gets to take a quiz to get a refresher on our rules and general RP etiquette! Please note we don't currently offer a path to account recovery. If you've lost access to an account you've had in the past, we aren't able to help you. You can try resetting your password, or making a new account. See ya IG soon, - Martin
    12 points
  3. "Caught in the Cross-Fire : Residents Struggle to Protect Their Families Amid a Decade-Old Asian-Latino Gang War" BY ADAM MCLEOD JUNE 30, 1994 12 AM PT TIMES STAFF WRITER The two young gangsters have never met, and yet given the chance they would probably try to kill each other. One belongs to Vespucci’s biggest Mexican gang. He’s a spindly 15-year-old who talks about defending his race with a gun tucked into his trousers. The other is a 17-year-old Cambodian who dropped out of school after seventh grade and joined a gang he hoped would protect him against “the Mexicans.” Although they still have peach fuzz on their faces, the two are seasoned soldiers in a racially charged gang war pitting Latinos against Asians on the streets of central and northern Vespucci, a conflict that has claimed at least 36 lives in the five years that police have been documenting the killings. The death toll includes three innocent Latino victims--ages 15 to 19--from Los Santos who were gunned down May 15 in front of stunned witnesses, just moments after leaving a birthday party near the Downtown region where they had gone to promote their dance club. Two teen-age Laotian gang members have been charged with three counts of murder and three counts of attempted murder in the incident, which left three other Latinos seriously wounded. The brazen attack drew a chorus of condemnation across Vespucci. But to those who live in the city’s meanest neighborhoods, it served only as a reminder of the unending gang violence over the years that has maimed countless victims, terrified residents and deepened resentment that may never heal. The shootings have left parents searching for ways to protect their families. Some have pulled their children out of school because of brawls and stabbings on campus. Others have taken even more extreme action, sending their sons back to Mexico in hopes of keeping them alive. “Families don’t know where to turn,” said Olivia Ochoa, an activist whose son was killed earlier this year in a shooting that police believe was carried out by Asian gang members. “The community is fear-ridden. Somehow, we have to pull things together.” The two sides in this war readily blame each other for starting the trouble. Both camps refuse to back down, instead speaking of the need to avenge their fallen brothers. Latino gang members say they fight to protect their barrios--their pride--against Asians intruding on their streets. “You’re backing up your race, so people won’t think Mexicans are punks,” said the defiant 15-year-old Latino, who proudly displays a twisted bullet wound on his stomach and a dime-sized nick on his hand like badges of honor. Although the stomach wound nearly left him dead a year ago, the eighth-grader remains defiant. “The Chinos are gonna lose,” he said, referring to Asian gangs. “They’re not as powerful as the Mexicans.” Latino gangs, who are primarily Mexican American, have deep roots in Vespucci. In some families, successive generations have joined up since the late 1960s, when Latinos started banding together in part to protect themselves against attacks by more dominant Latino gangs from other cities. Today, there are more than 5,000 Latino gang members in Vespucci, almost half the city’s gang population, according to a recent city report. By contrast, Asian gangs cropped up in Vespucci only a decade ago. Their emergence coincided with the influx of Southeast Asian refugees. The Asian gangsters--who are mostly Cambodian but also include Laotians, Vietnamese, Chinese and other groups--say they formed gangs as protection against attacks by their more numerous Latino rivals. Now, there are about 2,000 Asian gang members, according to the report. “I’d walk on the street and they’d jump me,” said the 17-year-old Cambodian, who joined his gang about two years ago and has a quarter-sized bullet wound on one of his calves. Now “I call my homies. If I can’t do nothin’ about it, my homies can.” Social workers say the young Asians mimicked their rivals’ lingo, graffiti, baggy clothing, tattoos and buzz haircuts--irritating the existing Latino gangs who viewed the newcomers as wanna-bes. By organizing, the Asian youths gained power not only to challenge their rivals but also to shake down residents and businesses in their own community, activists and police say. “Being in a gang made them feel important, respected,” said Chhay Sotha, a Cambodian social worker. “And they do get the respect, because people are intimidated by them.” In one sense, the gang war in Vespucci is no different from violence tearing at other cities where gangs regularly trade insults and gunfire to settle vendettas. But gang counselors and police see a disturbing trend in Vespucci: A conflict that began as a struggle over turf has deteriorated into an intractable race war. Now, killings are increasingly motivated by hate, with Asians and Latinos shooting one another on sight. “You’re walking down the street and see your enemy. You either beat him up or shoot him,” said a 14-year-old Cambodian gang member who boasts of many fights with Latino rivals. “It’s a game you play, but a reality game.” One Latino gang member, a 21-year-old who said he now refrains from violence, offered an equally nonchalant attitude shared by many of his fellow gangsters. “If I would be gangbanging, I would be blasting a lot of the Chinos,” he said. “If you live in the gang life, you gotta die in it.” Gang counselors say the battling has turned into an old grudge. “At this point, I think some of the younger kids don’t know why they are fighting,” said James M. McCoy, coordinator of the city’s gang prevention program. At the crux of the problem is a deep cultural divide. While rivals may live next door to one another in crowded neighborhoods, they are separated by an ocean of differences--from language and religion to food and music. Latino gang members refer derogatorily to all Asian gang members, regardless of origin, as “the Chinos.” For their part, Asian gangsters know all Latinos as “the Mexicans.” Tension between the two groups dates back to the early 1980s, shortly after thousands of Cambodians fleeing their war-torn country began arriving in Vespucci. Many refugees came here to join family, after spending their lives in rural areas, living in bamboo huts without running water or electricity. Here, they moved into poor, urban neighborhoods that had been home to Latinos and African Americans for years. Slowly the newcomers got a foothold--learning English, pooling their money, founding religious centers, and eventually opening businesses. Today, various estimates place their Vespucci population at 45,000 to 60,000. Their presence is well pronounced--with restaurants, grocery stores, jewelers and other shops--and some Cambodian residents envision the thoroughfare as a sort of Little Phnom Penh. Latino and Asian activists say the city should have prepared better for the racial tensions that exist today--pushing for cultural awareness classes in schools, establishing a dialogue between groups and seeking more racial diversity on the police force. Of the police department’s 762 sworn officers on May 1, there were 561 whites, 113 Latinos, 52 African Americans, 31 Asians and five Native Americans. Police Chief Arthur C. Heath said the police department is making efforts to recruit more minority officers, but added that police alone cannot be expected to solve a complex problem that involves schools, families and other factors. The activists and even some frustrated city officials, meanwhile, complain that City Hall has ignored the gang problem over the years because the violence hasn’t yet spread into affluent parts of the city. “I think the city has been in denial that a gang problem even exists,” said Councilwoman Tabitha Keller, a former county probation officer whose central Vespucci district includes many gang-infested neighborhoods. “For years, this city didn’t even want to recognize it, but I had (gang members) in Vespucci on my caseload.” Critics say the city examines its gang problems only when high-profile incidents push the issue to the surface. After the shootings of the three Latinos last month, police blanketed known gang areas temporarily to catch the suspects and to quell further violence. City Manager Harry C. Vaughn ordered the city Human Relations Commission to hold hearings on the Asian-Latino rift and other gang problems. But community activists say a police crackdown will not bring peace to the streets in the long run. And they criticize the commission for failing to invite enough young people to the hearings, which were held outside the central city communities most affected by the gang war. The commissioners point to the good they expect out of their recent meetings. At their urging, the City Council approved emergency recreation programs for the summer that will include city vehicles that bring sports equipment, board games and other activities to parks. The commission plans to hold further meetings on gang problems and will issue a final report to the council this fall. Deputy City Manager Joseph Rees, who coordinates the city’s response to gangs, conceded that officials were slow to respond to the gang violence initially, partly because leaders hadn’t expected tensions to flare between Latinos and Asians. But Rees said the recent commission meetings are only the latest effort to address the gang troubles. In recent years, the city also has hired more police and formed athletic leagues for inner-city youths, among other things, he said. Rees heads a new task force that is examining the effectiveness of various anti-gang programs run by the city and other organizations. Next month, the task force, which includes police, youths, school district officials, court officials and others, will list anti-gang programs that deserve the most funding, he said. Some police and gang counselors question whether the city’s efforts will have any impact on gang members who feel shunted by adult authorities and care little about official edicts. “All the meetings in the world aren’t going to make a bit of difference if you’ve got a 15-year-old running around at 10 o’clock at night with an Uzi in his hand and killing on his mind,” said Vespucci police Sgt. Joe Gallagher, who oversees a joint gang task force with the FBI. City leaders, police and community activists appear to agree on one point: Any solution will have to include grass-roots organizations that work closely with the gangs. Some counselors on the street say that real change will ultimately rest with the families and religious institutions that play a dominant role in the Latino and Asian communities. Yet even a dedicated corps of counselors and pastors will have a difficult time putting an end to the gang war because of the racial animosity that divides the sides and fuels the violence, activists warn. Gang members themselves scoff at notions of peace, and are reluctant to consider a truce like the one that has helped bring a tentative peace among some African American gangs in Watts. The young gang members in Long Beach are prepared to continue the battle, they say, even if it means their own lives. “We’re not gonna let ‘em shoot us,” said the 17-year-old Cambodian gang member with the bullet wound on his calf. “If they do, we’ll shoot them back.” E/S Tiny Raskal Gang The E/S Tiny Raskal Gang, also known as TRG, Tiny Raskal Gang or Rascals for short, is a primarily, however not exclusively an Asian American (mainly ethnically Cambodian) gang based in Vespucci, San Andreas. The gang was founded by Cambodian refugees sometime in the early 1980s, part of their cause to protect themselves from the larger, more numerous gangs in their neighborhoods. Initially, a mere cause which connected numerous youth crews and gangs across Vespucci, and shortly after nearby cities. Its members identify gray as their gang's color of distinction, a custom and practice that has waned somewhat in accordance to the police crackdowns specifically targeting gang members. The gang has no official allies while their main rivals are historically the East Side Longos and the South East Asia (SEA) alliance which includes the Asian Boyz Crips, Exotic Family City Crips, Suicidal Town Crips and the Sons of Samoa Gangster Crips, however they also bump heads with the Insane Crip Gang and the Rollin 20s Crip Gang occasionally. The decades of ongoing feud with local Sureños gangs as well as rival Asian gangs such as the Asian Boyz Crips has exhausted the E/S Tiny Raskal Gang over the years resulting in a decline of membership, presence and control in the city of Vespucci, this was also a result of a significant number of TRG members being deported back to their home countries for being negligent of the law and overall reckless citizens. Although the Tiny Raskal Gang consists of primarily South East Asians, that hasn't stopped members of more prominent racial groups within Vespucci in joining the ranks of the Tiny Raskal Gang as the gang accepts members of all races, a handful of members of African-American and Hispanic descent have grown to be prominent and outstanding members within the ranks of the Tiny Raskal Gang.
    4 points
  4. Out-of-Character Armenian Power 13 will serve as a continuation to the events of Operation Power Outage, a sting operation that was targeted at arresting and indicting members of the criminal group operating in the United States. Our goal is to deliver a high-end portrayal of our real life counterpart, and create an experience that is immersive and gritty. Therefore, we have strict standards of roleplay and conduct, and we only seek those who want to develop a well-rounded and realistic character. If you are interested in climbing the ladder quickly, as opposed to helping to build a well-paced storyline, then this is not the right faction for you. We welcome new and veteran roleplayers alike. All prospective members must enter and progress within the faction via in-character means, however, in the interest of authenticity, we are happy to help plan characters and create non-critical links where appropriate (e.g. relatives, old friends, jail affiliates). Any questions or concerns regarding the faction can be directed to Street Boss.
    2 points
  5. THE BLACK HAND: THE BLOODY RISE AND REDEMPTION OF "HAMMER" SARMIENTO, A MEXICAN MOB KILLER PDF, EPUB, EBOOK Henry Blankenstein | 389 pages | 05 Dec 2011 | TaylorMurphy Publishers Inc| 1683361215469 | English | New York, United States Description: THE BLACK HAND is the true story of Luis Sarmiento, aka "Hammer," and his rise in a secret criminal organization, a new Mafia, that already has a grip on all organized crime in San Andreas and soon all of the United States. This Mafia is using a base army of an estimated 60,000 heavily armed, loyal Latino gang members, called Surenos, driven by fear and illicit profits. They are the most dangerous gang in American history and they wave the flag of the Black Hand. Mafioso Sarmiento gives an insider′s view of how he devoted his life to the cause--the Mexican Mafia, La Familia Mexicana, also known as La Eme--only to find betrayal and disillusionment at the end of a bloody trail of violence that he followed for two decades. And now, award-winning investigative journalist Henry Blankenstein, with the unprecedented cooperation of Luis Sarmiento, reveals the inner workings, secret meetings, and elaborate murder plots that make up the daily routine of the Mafia brothers. It is an intense, never-before-told story of a man who devoted his life to a bloody cause only to find betrayal and disillusionment. Based on years of research and investigation, Henry Blankenstein has delivered a historic narrative of a nefarious organization that will go down as a classic in mob literature. The Black Hand: The Bloody Rise and Redemption of Luis Hammer Sarmiento, a Mexican Mob Killer PDF BOOK There is no doubt that some skeptics will say this book 1s nothing more than a glorification of the Mexican Mafia and gang violence. Interesting read, as these guys can spin a good yarn and the details of the Mexic Typical mob story, thug rises through the ranks and finds that the life he thought he was living was hollow after all. A Mmnt—Mob Convention In , Sarmiento left the Mexican Mafia. He moved his chair back and forth on its hind legs and stared at Judge Cooper as she set his murder trial date for January 1, He was reasonably comfortable in prison. Ramon Mundo Mendoza, who participated in twenty mob hits before he defected in the late s, says that they dedicated ther lives to making a career out of crime. I get this was already a lot of terrain to cover, but I really wish it included some analysis. In the years to come, I hope that Sarmiento will do everything he can to dispel that myth. Despite the fact that he was not Mexican and he entered the Mafia at the advanced age of forty, Morgan was dubbed the Godfather of La Eme with a few years. Make your own conclusions, but if you feel inspired, do read this and hear his voice. What is now different about me? My second gripe 1s a little more nebulous. It was all killing for the sake of killing, to claim superiority on the yard, to let other cons know Eme should be feared. There 1s no way 1 personally could do any of these crimes but reading about tt 1s another story. Some of the names listed had the letters eMe written next to them. Wow, couldnt believe what 1 was reading Excellent. Once reading the introduction I was hooked and wanted to know more about this young boy getting involved more and more with these seriously crazy people. Certainly, some who find themselves on the other side of the law were driven there by mistreatment in their own homes while growing up. Readers will formulate their own opinions about Hammer Sarmiento. He lives in Los Santos. View 2 comments. Together they would cease Mexican street gang rivalries inside prison, control the herom trafficking, protect themselves against unruly prison guards, and unite as brothers carnales against rival black and white inmates. Hammer doesn't feel shame for exacting violence upon other crimmals, but he does regret wasting his life in service to La Eme and missing a chance at having a family and a life on the outside. Mexican Mafia History 3. Naomi Paik. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Those who resisted Eme extortion were beaten or stabbed. This ruling released a new wave of Mexican Mafia members onto the streets. View all 4 comments. Hammer's parole poses a serious security risk to him, his family, his parole agents, and the community in which he 1s placed," Brown wrote. He does, though, pomt out shortcoming in society and family that lead countless youths into a damning life of crime. Published: University of California Press - May 26th, There are a lot of really awkward sentences and occasionally it's unclear what exactly 1s happening, Even though I am still Itving behind bars, life now has a true, unfamiliar sweetness to it that is almost beyond my ability to describe with words. It is a pretty raw account and the fact that "Hammer" was quoted saying different things from loving the mob life, to be scared, to hating it; it made the autobiography pretty intense. He says that la eMe rums everything it touches. Retrieved 22 July A happy face was sketched night next to the comment. This book was a HUGE disappomtment. An excellent read for anyone studying the history of Los Santos or simply interested in organized crime. The Black Hand: The Bloody Rise and Redemption of Luis Hammer Sarmiento, a Mexican Mob Killer Writer Want to Read Currently Reading Read. I got the sense that there was a lot about Hammer that was being sanitized. Our conversations far outreached material for the book. There were more than a thousand mmates on the yard. Every time I am given the opportunity I strive to educate law enforcement, academics, behavioral scientists, and the general public about the national threat of urban street terrorism and nontraditional organized crime. My wife in a burst of anger taught me a quality that was anatherm to a mob guy—empathy. A feisty woman on the other end of the line eviscerated me with a torrent of punishing words. Charlie White was a black inmate upset about Eme bullying tactics. In an effort to establish a consistent narrative flow, the information supplied by all of the above is not always referenced specifically. Create a List. Retrieved 24 December Then, while awaiting trial, he did two other bloody hits inside the Los Santos County Jait—stabbing the rival mobsters so many times that it was only a stroke of fate that kept them from making an early trp to their graves. In closing, I wish to thank you for the cordiality with which you treated my mother. La Eme Spreading Like a Cancer Typical mob story, thug rises through the ranks and finds that the life he thought he was living was hollow after all. But as soon as you step into the SHU, tt hits you like a wave. Unfortunately I can not give more than 2 stars as a rating. The Mafia- induced subculture destroys our most precious commodity—the minds of our young people. Hammer Sarmiento recounts his seventeen years of beg a "Carnal" a senior leader in the most powerful crimmnal organization functioning in the California prison system, the Mexican Mafia. Upload Sign In Join. We considered them pests that need to be extermmnated. In keeping with my recent ability to misunderstand the thrust of a book's title, I picked up Black Hand hoping to learn about Mexican Drug Cartels, and instead learned a bit about La Eme, the Mexican Mafia, which was plenty interesting too. Hungry Piranhas in a Tank (( Our goal is to role-play the Mexican Mafia to a very realistic extent while also maintaining a good balance between realism and fun. We believe that the Mexican Mafia in general, apart from a few notable exceptions, hasn't always managed to maintain it's activity and help out factions with role-playing. Therefore it is our main focus to provide realistic role-play and presence in-game, while also having actual benefits for factions that pledge alliance to the organization. In order to achieve this, we have involved previous leadership of good Mexican Mafia eras as our advisors, as well as experienced sureño role-players and we hope to make our own impact to your day to day role-play on the server. Also, we will give equal priority to providing a realistic prison environment for locked up hispanic role-players, ensuring that your role-play and development continues even when in jail. We encourage all sureño factions to get in touch with us and involved, in order to achieve a realistic California-esque setting within sureño factions. Join our discord. Any comments, questions or concerns can be forwarded to myself,@Mario and @SkanteVida27 ))
    2 points
  6. Congrats! However I want to introduce a new trend. #Kane4Management
    2 points
  7. Hi. It's good seeing so many familiar faces around on the new project. i steal all your belongings yes
    1 point
  8. A triad is a Chinese transnational organized crime syndicate based in Greater China and has outposts in various countries with significant overseas Chinese populations. The organizational structure of Chinese organized crime in the United States is quite complex. Broadly defined, there is a great variety of Chinese criminal organizations. These include gangs, secret societies, triads, tongs, Taiwanese organized crime groups, and strictly US-based tongs and gangs. According to Ko-lin Chin, the foremost academic expert in the U.S. on Chinese organized crime, there is no empirical support for the belief that there is a well-organized, monolithic, hierarchical criminal cartel called the “Chinese Mafia.” The Chinese gangs are best known for trafficking in heroin and opium, but they are in fact as diversified as the biggest multinational conglomerate. Among their other activities are arms smuggling, credit card fraud, counterfeiting, software piracy, prostitution, gambling, loansharking, white-collar crime, home-invasion robbery, high-tech theft, and trafficking in endangered animals and plants. The triads are equally increasingly involved in the smuggling of illegal aliens. U.S. officials estimate that up to 100,000 Chinese are illegally smuggled into the country each year, many of them forced to live in involuntary obedience for a long period of time, while they work off their debt to the gangsters and smugglers that helped them to make their way into the states. In order to simplify and focus our discussion, this analysis will concentrate on the Fuk Ching gang. The Fuk Ching are active in Liberty City, and are regarded as one of the most powerful, and also transnationally active, Chinese organized crime groups in the U.S. (Chin, 1996). They are estimated to have approximately 35 members, with another 20 members currently in prison. Other major gangs in Liberty include the Ghost Shadows, Flying Dragons, Tung On, and Born-to-Kill. The Liberty City gangs, like the Fuk Ching, mainly operate extortion and protection rackets in defined neighborhoods in Liberty City’s Chinatown. Their victims are mostly businesses in Chinatown. In San Andreas, however, the Chinese organized crime presence, and the problem is quite different from that in Liberty City. In San Andreas, the dominant groups are the Wo Hop To and the Wah Ching. The Liberty City Police Department (LCPD), which polices the neighborhood in which the Fuk Ching are active, uses all the standard law enforcement practices commonly used to combat organized crime. These include informants, undercover investigators, and electronic surveillance. In addition, both the police and the FBI support and encourage extortion victims to use hotlines to report their victimization. The LCPD has also created an Asian Gang Intelligence Unit that employs street patrols to monitor street gangs. One of the structural characteristics that make Chinese organized crime different from other forms is the relationship between some of the street gangs and certain adult organizations. The latter are called tongs. The Fuk Ching, for example, is affiliated with the Fukien American Association. The Fukien American Association – as with other tongs and their relationships with gangs – provide the Fuk Ching with a physical place to gather and hang out. They allow the gang to operate on their (the tong’s) territory, thus legitimizing them with the community. Which is what usually appears in San Andreas as well. The smaller Chinese gangs fall under triads, that allows them to distribute and use their street as their so-called turf. In the state of San Andreas, there are more than thirty-two estimated Cantonese-American street gangs, and triads. One of them is the Paul Yin Gang, the street gang gained power in the early beginning of the 21st century when a huge wave of Cantonese-American migrants went to the Korean district of Los Santos. Many of them were smuggled through containers, which forced them to work for the smugglers/gangsters until they paid their debt off. Even though the Paul Yin Gang has had little to no influence over the area for the past twenty years, they've made quite a big name for themselves, as the LSPD had launched multiple raids in the area, charging many affiliates with money laundering charges, and involvement in loansharking. Over the last 2 decades, the United States and especially San Andreas has seen a huge inflow of Asian Americans. A look at how great of an Asian population there is in San Andreas is simply by looking at the enrollment at the University of Los Santos schools. UC Los Santos consists of Asian American and UC Red County is approximately 45%. This migration of Asians has brought many hard workers but it has also brought a new form of gangs more violent and brutal than America has ever seen. The Triads and the Tongs are one of the reasons why some Asian-Americans feel it necessary to join these gangs even though it seems to contradict the Asian "model minority" myth. The Asian American has been stereotyped as the "model minority", which implies that Asians have a strong work ethic, low profile, and a sense of loyalty to their family. Yet crimes by Asians in gangs have been occurring throughout San Andreas much more frequently than in years past. There seems to be a definite irony here in that the increases in Asian-American youth crime and the stereotype of Asian-Americans do not follow the same pattern. One such reason for this deviation is based on a matter of perspective in that one might consider crime by Asian-American youth as an occupation. If one takes into consideration that crime could be considered an occupation, then if the Asian-American work ethic focuses on succeeding in the new world, then the crime cannot be ruled out as an option to attaining financial class success. However, there is a more reasonable explanation as to why current Asian youth seem to deviate from the so-called "model minority" myth because of the two different phases in which Asians came to the United States. This huge inflow of Asians into San Andreas essentially occurred in two phases. In 1965, Congress passed an Immigration Act which abolished the old national-origins quota and increased the limit of 100 immigrants from countries within the "Asian-Pacific Triangle" to 20,000 immigrants per country from the Eastern Hemisphere, plus immigrants accepted within family preference standards: specifically spouses, minor children, and parents of citizens. This gave rise to a major wave of Asian immigration to America. This first wave in the 1 970s consisted of Asians who were highly educated, middle class, and urban. They arrived in a very short time frame, which allowed them to establish themselves successfully in America and thus was born the "model minority" myth. These immigrants were hard-working and stressed education as the tools to success and these tools would allow them to live the "American Dream." But more recently the second wave which started around the mid 1980s to the present, the immigrants from Asia have been mainly refugees from harsh political conditions in Southeast Asia. These recent immigrants arrive seeking new jobs and new opportunities but the job market is shrinking for less-skilled workers due to technological change. There has been increased immigration into the United States because under the current family preference system, it admits not only spouses, minor children, and parents of citizens, but also siblings and children over the age of two. But, for too many of these immigrants, coming to America has been a myth-shattering experience; because they soon realize that it is still very hard to succeed in America. When immigrants arrive in America, they strive for financial status and a comfortable home. However the first means to achieve financial status is through a professional job but a professional job requires training and some form of education. Immigrants who face a language barrier have trouble attaining that education they need especially if a college degree is needed because it is difficult to raise the money to afford higher education. Entrepreneurship is blocked by many of these same obstacles. And media success is forgettable because of the tiny market for Asian Americans in the media. Consequently, these new immigrants arrive in America with little prospect for employment and thus contribute to the growing percentage of Asian-Americans living below the poverty line. In order to simply survive, some Asian youth turn to crime in order to get some of the things that their parents cannot give them, which is usually influenced by poverty, greed, social comfort, and overall attention. Hell Side Wah Ching 1990s The gang’s origins lie in the tag-banging crew Hellside Asian Boys (HAB), whose ex-members made up the core of Hellside Wah Ching’s membership. While original members of HAB were primarily concerned with graffiti and graffiti culture, the merge with KTown Seaside Mafia (KSM) severely transformed the nature of HAB. While prior to the merge, HAB had partaken in petty crime, merging with another tag-banging crew irreversibly changed the crew. Local law enforcement officials had speculated that the clique was primarily 'created' due to the spiking interest in the drug market. Following the merge the gang was known as Hellside Mafia and has been involved in selling drugs onto a new lucrative drug market appearing due to the mass-immigration of Asian/Chinese immigrants in the Little Seoul Area. It's been rumored that certain members of the gang had developed ties to the local tong. It's been speculated that the tong had used Hellside Mafia as their muscle when it came to local extortions and drug trafficking. 2000s At the brink of a new millennium a bloody feud had occurred. What was formerly known as the Hellside Mafia had split into Hellside Wah Ching and KTown Circle Boys. The members of Hellside Mafia whom had pled allegiance to the local tong had then formed the core membership of the Hellside Wah Ching, whilst everybody who "didn't get with the program" became part of the KTown Circle Boys clique. In 2003 the Los Santos Police Department classified them as a street gang for prosecution purposes when three HWC members Nestor Chung, 17, James Chuang, 16, along with Joshua Hu, 17 and Omar Chin, 15 who was not in a gang were involved in the double homicide of Jack Cho, 14 and his father Li Cho, 45, on November 5, 2003. Jack’s brother, Bradley Cho, 17, was a member of the KTown Circle Boys and had a dispute with Joshua at their high school earlier that day. The four assailants were looking for Bradley when they shot and killed his little brother (not a gang member) and his father. It's been said that the tong had severed ties with the Hellside Wah Ching following the homicide of Jack Cho and his father. Calais Avenue (忠诚) is a group of Roleplayers aiming to portray a realistic Chinese tong/triad located at Little Seoul, Korean Plaza/Calais Avenue. All aspiring players may approach us ICly, roleplaying a "move in" is highly frowned upon in the faction as neighborhood-foreign locals are not engaged proactively in the faction' activities whether classmates or known locals, friends, etc. are more involved. We suggest reading any sort of guide on how to portray a realistic Chinese mobster member prior to joining us, however, be aware that Calais Avenue puts heavy emphasis on environmental/group realism as a whole as well, affiliates and members may not post screenshots on the thread until they've been approved via our as we're very strict on ourselves regarding the fashion regime we've been aiming to give out on our thread. We also have a guide in our Discord server which you are free to read. Upon joining the faction you also instantly agree to be Character Killed by the High Council members within the faction. Anyone wanting to roleplay with our faction is required to join our Discord server.
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  9. The Carson Mafia Gang, also known as the "Carson Mafia Gangster Bloods (CMGB)", is a predominant, long standing African-American street gang formed during the late 1970s by a man known on the streets as “Kay Bee” in the western district of Davis, Los Santos. This set started off as a clique of the notorious "Carson Mafia Family Gang" which held dominance over Davis but later separated after it went defunct. Carson Mafia falls under the Gangster (3X / trays) card but it also represents the Mafia umbrella. It's territory runs along Carson Avenue toward the Grove Street Circle connected by Covenant Avenue which is also known as "The Bottom". Several homicides are reported in this poverty stricken neighborhood, making it one of the most dangerous neighborhoods to reside in. Many believe that Carson Mafia went defunct with the start of the new century but their presence remain as intact as it ever was. Their turf is surrounded by other hostile sets, including a vast Surenos presence in Rancho to the south and Crip presence to the north in Strawberry which keeps it under constant pressure. The Carson Mafia Gangster Bloods have attracted a lot of attention from Law Enforcement, which also resulted in several Gang Injunctions. Many affiliates were incarcerated during the early 90s, and during the late 2000s which put a deep impact on the functioning of the set along the road. Young teenagers are driven toward street gangs because of it's luxuries but never know the outcome of the lifestyle until after they are already in. Some think, that it's the older generations that are raising these kids in this poverty filled area is the cause of them not wanting to go to school and make their life better like the rest. But little do they know the police have been very brutal to people in this neighborhood way before then in the black empowerment movements such as the Black Panthers and other organizations to help rebuild the community. Different desires are found in everyone around the neighborhood, some want protection, some want power while others are just in for the money. This is what starts and powers a street gang. Most of the locals in the area have been getting mixed in with the gang activity, and drug distribution through the urge of wanting to get involved in the activities that is going on in their neighborhood. A lot of the members are born and raised into the street gang through family members teaching them the lifestyle and tactics that are past down generation after generation. The gang violence continues to get stronger in the area influencing other neighborhoods in the region to do the same or create their own, and this is what brought most of the gang violence. Politics & Whack Outs The older generation of the gang were nothing too different. They wore red rags to associate themselves with the blood coalition and also did taggings of their gang graffiti in their rivals hood and it was also known to be run with some structure. Structure is what made the gang what it is today. They had rules and guidelines that you had to follow and if you didn’t you would get disciplined depending on your actions. The street gang were always known to be big in numbers and due to that reasoning people really feared the gang. The younger generation were taught to follow what was said to them and if they needed something to get done then that means it needs to get done, no questions were meant to be asked. The older generation had the younger members do their dirty work as the older generation had been getting targeted by the LSPD. The gangs were known to be more respectful and didn’t want anything to happen to people that didn’t have anything to deal with what was going on. People's families were known to be kept out of the profound beefs and if anything were to happen to them, you would receive certain consequences. The gang's structure was undeniably strong and were known to be ruthless and reckless for anything that crossed their paths. After years and years went by the structure started to slowly fade away. The new generation of the gang started to do anything and everything. They started to shoot up people's homes, and diss other rival gangs on social media. They would take disrespectful terms to social media and diss them there. The school system got worse as most of the gang interactions happened there. They had one on one fist fights and also gang brawls after school, many people from many different gangs were jumping rivals and it was completely unsafe. The older members of the gang started to lose the tight rope that they had over them and they didn’t know what to do. Many of the politics started to break up and other bloods started to beef with some other bloods and then they eventually became “CMG” which is a short abbreviation for Crab murder gang. The terminology was created by the younger affiliates as they had profound beefs with any and every gang that was under the Crip umbrella. The gang today is still standing strong and is still trying to get their politics back but how it is right now, it's not looking like that would be happening anytime soon. An insider war broke out within the set in the late 2000s when OG Menace was murdered in cold blood after recently being released from the penitentiary. All cliques turned against each other and a full out war broke out, which resulted in several deaths including Innocents and police officers. Gang and Narcotics Department finally issued a gang injunction in the name of Carson Mafia Gangster Bloods and the police presence went up a notch with gang enforcement police officers. People barely left their homes and affiliates either went to lay low or moved out entirely. This was believed to be the downfall of the street gang for good but it strived in the poverty filled neighborhood. The memorial of OG Menace and other affiliates still stand in the alley behind Covenant Avenue and he is still honored by the young members of the set. A hood day is similar to a block party is hosted every year by the affiliates to show their love and dedication to the set. This culture has been passed down since earlier generations throughout LS. Affiliates who took a bullet for the set are honored with liquor and other narcotics. Sweep The Streets The Carson Mafia Gangster Bloods instantly turned to drugs on how they made their money. They also used them heavily and around the area is known to be infested with crack and meth. The gang turned into using the drugs in the late 1970s but eventually ended up selling them to feud their habits. They started to sell drugs such as Crack and Meth and adapted more drugs as they went. The gang started to be more organized inside of the late 2000s as they made the drug game a good business for them, racking in over thousands of dollars a day for the gang. They used the money to acquire females, more drugs and more importantly protection for their gang. They also used the money for self reasons but if you stole from them, they were known to retaliate in dangerous ways. That being said, more people started to try to buy instead of robbing them, they showed some kind of fear towards the gang. They gang was also known to not be nice with their consumers. They were known for taxing over the amount of the drug and some of the members from the gang also took the consumer's money and sold fake/laced drugs in return. Sad to say, anything that's shady always gets brought to light. On January 17th, 2014 the street gang had a massive drug bust and multiple members of the street gang went to prison with lengthy jail sentences. Years later they got the attention of the LSPD due to how much drugs they were putting out on the streets of Los Santos this then soon led to the devastating crackdown that shut down nearly all of their operations. April 7th, 2018, AKA, The Cleanup LSPD Officer's alongside FIB agents conducted a raid of a high-ranking member's Aunties house in which he was believed to be staying for the night. Inside of the house was Gerald “MoneyMan” Gibson, Jaylen “Greedo” Moore, Shaun “SBoy” Mullings and Jerome “Snoopy” Gibson. Marwuan Willimas Los Santos County, or known as " Moneyman " was charged with Brandishing a weapon, Handling a firearm in an improper manner in a motor vehicle, Carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, Carrying a Loaded Firearm in Public, Possession of an Assault Weapon, As a minor, possess a fake ID that you intend to use to buy firearms. Garret Barkend Los Santos County, or known as " Greedo " was charged with Brandishing a weapon, Handling a firearm in an improper manner in a motor vehicle, Carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, Carrying a Loaded Firearm in Public, Possession of an Assault Weapon, As a minor, possess a fake ID that you intend to use to buy firearms. Tristan Stokes Of Los Santos County, or known as " Two Boy" was charged with Brandishing a weapon, Handling a firearm in an improper manner in a motor vehicle, Carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, Carrying a Loaded Firearm in Public, Possession of an Assault Weapon, As a minor, possess a fake ID that you intend to use to buy firearms. Today, the gang-banging routine has lost it's initial touch but it's still far from being over. It may seem like the gang activity has decreased but actually, the lifestyle just got smarter. Youngin's don't post up on corners anymore to sell drugs. Instead, social media is being used daily. People aren't killed over wearing the wrong colors like in the 80's and the 90's, but they still die over a ten dollar bill. The lifestyle which has been passed down generationally from growing up in this area. With that being said, the neighborhood is still filled with a violent gang presence. The Carson Mafia Gangster Bloods are surrounded by Mexican and other Crip street gangs. The gang is known to beef with All gangs that fall under the Crip card and later adapted the CMG tag which stands for "Crab Murda Gang". The younger generation of the gang is known to get into brawls and fist fights with them in and out of school and also talk over all social media platforms with them saying things from, dissing their dead homies to arranging brawls outside. This lead to most of the younger generation members of the gang going to jail or letting the law enforcement get familiar with their faces. The street-gang is known to have plenty members around the gang and their are known to bring terror and react aggressively when people disrespect them. The Carson Mafia Gang have a close relationship with the Denver Lane Bloods. This alliance is known by the 1st generation as the Denver Mafias and Mafia Lanes by the 2nd generation. The other significant alliance is with the Avenue Piru Gang. In 2019, both sets commenced their hood days on the same day to represent the close alliance. Other allies are the Weirdos Gangster Bloods, and the Inglewood Family Gang. They are also allies of the Rollin 20s Neighborhood Bloods, Family Swan Bloods, Black P Stones, Harvard Park Brims and the SouthSide MadAss Gangster Pirus. Their rivals are 102 Raymond Avenue Crips, Osage Legend Crips, Mad Ass Gangster Crips, Rollin 60s Neighborhood Crips, Imperial Village Crips, Water Gat Crips and the Tonga Crip Gang. This Faction Thread will be updated based on IC events.
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  10. GUIDE TO PAISA ROLEPLAY @Freedom Fighter, @EGN & @Nuke Introduction Understanding Narco culture USA Paisa Prison culture & Paisa Gangs USA based Paisa plenipotentiaries Females in the Narco underworld Summary Everything above is what you can expect to read about and learn in this guide, the guide itself will be kept somewhat short but still detailed enough to give people a deep insight to how they should roleplay their characters. This guide will be simply what it’s intended for, a guide, so don’t expect me to hold your hand and give you a step by step walkthrough. INTRODUCTION Hey there, if you’re reading this then it’s probably because you want to know more about roleplaying a Mexican National, if so there’s a lot of stuff you need to know about roleplay as a person involved in the Paisa criminal underworld. It can get very tricky and complex, to a point that a lot of stuff can actually get confusing. We’ve personally been roleplaying in the Paisa scene for years and a lot of our knowledge has been gathered through external sources, reading between the lines, speaking to certain individuals that have grown up around Narco traffickers etc, although we’re not experts on the subject, we do believe our knowledge is enough to justify reasoning to make this. Also, lil tip it’s pronounced “Pie-sa”, “Pie-sa-no”, “Pie-sa-na”. UNDERSTAND NARCO CULTURE Understanding Narco culture can be quite confusing at times, especially if you don’t know an awful lot about the background of Mexico, and how traffickers evolved from individual plaza (turf) bosses running their own designated sections, to eventually being aligned to many of the different cartels throughout the country. The thing with Narco traffickers is, at the very beginning they were all mostly from the state of Sinaloa, and keep this in your head because it plays a major connection a bit further into this guide, but originally it was plaza bosses running their own little turfs until Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo had a bright idea to form Mexico’s first Narco commission, which became known as the Guadalajara Cartel; Mexico’s very first legitimate “Cartel”. But the major thing about this? The Guadalajara Cartel didn’t just become powerful due to having plaza bosses operating as a union under them, quite the opposite, sure it was a part in their power uprise but if it wasn’t for the Dirección Federal de Seguridad (DFS) the Guadalajara Cartel wouldn’t have been anything. The DFS is sort of like the CIA of Mexico, but the FBI at the same time. You’re probably wondering why I’m giving you this rundown, well it’s pretty simple because the Cartels in Mexico are usually backed by someone; the most powerful ones that is. It’s not hard to figure this out of course, but another major part of understanding Narco culture, especially in the modern day and age is to understand the political parties that are in Mexico. ] See, the thing is parties like MORENA and the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) are all allegedly backing Cartels to this very day in Mexico. Two examples of this is MORENA allegedly backing the Sinaloa Cartel and the PRI allegedly backing the Jalisco New Generation Cartel. This is one of the biggest issues when it comes to Narco roleplay, understanding the political parties, their goals and history because to fully understand the Narco underworld in Mexico, you first need to understand the political parties that run it. You remember The Zetas? The first group of mad men to turn Mexico’s Narco warfare into militarized combat? I’ll give you a few seconds to figure out how they managed to reign in huge control for almost a decade without any interference. That’s right, if you guessed the PRI then you know more than I thought you know already. See the PRI ruled Mexico through various presidential elections for decades upon decades, not losing a single one meaning they had control of the country, but when the MORENA party won one election it set off a ticking timebomb in the country that forever changed the criminal underworld in it. At the time the Zetas weren’t really known as the Zetas per say n were still coming up, and hadn’t fully found their identification yet but the PRI took note of them being Ex Cuerpo de Fuerzas Especiales (GAFES) and decided to manipulate it to their favour, helping a paramilitarized wing of the Gulf Cartel rise to power and eventually become their own thing once they split. Does this remind you of anything? That’s also right, if you guessed the Jalisco New Generation Cartel you know more than I thought you already knew. Just like the Z splitting from GAFES, Mencho split from the Milenio Cartel and with the PRI’s backing ended up forming CJNG. So I think by now you’re pretty versed in knowing that without political parties pulling strings, nothing would go. Now, you remember I mentioned Sinaloa priorly? Remember I said keep it in the back of your mind? Well that’s because most of these Cartels were once headed by Sinaloense Capos, who were mostly born in Badiraguato; described as Mexican Sicily. Sinaloa Cartel, Tijuana Organization, Juarez Organization etc were all founded by Sinaloan traffickers at one point in time. There’s also a common popular fashion trend in Mexico called Buchón/Buchóna fashion, this originated in Sinaloa and is now used country wide. The Buchón/Buchóna fashion trend was a way most Narco traffickers dressed, and eventually before you knew it, it became a common day trend among many people in the Mexican countryside and mountains. A contributing factor to the militarization of various drug cartels operating in Mexico is the recruitment of special forces, from both Mexico and other countries such as the Kaibiles of Guatemala. The majority of cartel operatives do not have military experience, and are instead trained by those who do. While the number of special forces who desert and join these organizations is generally low, the cartels supplement this by hiring police officers wherever they can. While it's rare for corrupt law enforcement to participate in crime in the United States, these cells filled entirely with Municipal police officers commit some of the most heinous murders and high profile kidnappings. Many "murder houses" were discovered to have been ran by such police cells. One's position in the organization depends on the skills a person provides for leadership such as logistical experience or business degrees. This assigns you to a position in the pyramid, the top dedicated to the most influential individuals and families controlling the entity itself. Once assigned a position it is very hard to rise above middle management, this could be equated to a lifetime position at a company but without the ability to move up to the very top. Despite what the media tells you, El Chapo was not the zenith of Sinaloa's hierarchy. They will also put their reputation behind other groups from south and central america, such as but not limited to Colombians, Cubans, Guatemalans, Panamanians and Venezuelans. They use such people who overstay their visas and remain illegally within Mexico to extort street vendors, clubs and taxi companies among many other businesses. This sophisticated scam is common throughout Latin America, known as 'gota a gota', offering small loans through Colombian front men and then begin to pressure more money by increasing the interest rates by %400 within only a few weeks. Another thing to keep in mind with the Narco underworld is that everyone is kept tabs on, what I mean by this is if you’re employed to work with a Cartel cell, chances are they already know more about you than you know about yourself. The reason for this is, it’s hugely beneficial for them to know who they’re employing, and when it comes to the fear factor, family and close friends are often threatened. Those with relatives are normally the ones that get second chances and stuff with their family being used as collateral, whilst those employed without relatives are usually given one shot and if they fuck up they’re tossed to the trash pile, the reasoning for this yet again is to ensure safety of the organization as a person who has something to lose is more likely to follow commands than someone who has nothing to lose would. "La Santa Muerte has crossed the US/Mexico Border for over a decade, accompanying her devotees on their arduous journeys north. Also known as La Flaquita (The Skinny One), La Niña Blanca (The White Girl), La Niña Negra (The Black Girl), Señora de las Sombras (Lady of the Shadows), La Huesuda (Bony Lady), La Niña Bonita (The Pretty Girl), La Madrina (The Godmother), and more reverently, La Santísima Muerte (The Most Holy Death), she is a beloved saint of dispossessed peoples. I first met Santa Muerte in 2002 during fieldwork with undocumented migrant transgender sex workers from Guadalajara, Mexico, who lived in San Francisco. Santa Muerte featured prominently on home altars in their single-room occupancy hotel rooms. I had not encountered the saint before and was surprised by her obvious importance in their lives. Thus began over a decade of following Santa Muerte to Mexico, California, the US/Mexico Border, and even small towns in northern Wisconsin. In the early years of my research, few people in Mexico would talk to me about her, and few in the US knew of her; she was either underground or unknown. Now, the Bony Lady is “out” and very visible. Since early 2000, worship has grown dramatically in Mexico and in the US, especially among migrants. I came to understand her popularity among migrants and LGBTQ communities in Mexico; she is associated with those living precarious lives and/or engaged in dangerous undertakings. What surprised me, however, was that government entities both in the US and in Mexico, shared my interest in the Bony Lady. The Drug Enforcement Agency, the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, the Mexican government, and the Mexican military all actively oppose the worship of Santa Muerte. A Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) law enforcement bulletin claims: “Santa Muerte informational training can prove so stressful for some law enforcement and public safety officers that they can become physically ill and pass out. This has happened more than once. Programs and writings concerning wellness and spirituality can provide ‘spiritual armor’”" The practice and worship of Santa Muerte is widely known for its crossing of Catholic symbology with indigenous beliefs featuring totems, amulets, curses and blessings as well as sacrifice. The most common and visual display of worship is the act of putting offerings to the spirit world in the form of an altar. This altar is commonly known as an ofrenda, used by Mexican peoples to celebrate Día de Muertos, a tradition dating back to the Aztecs. The ofrenda is usually a table adorned with fine and colorful fabrics with offerings of fruits, cigarettes, candies and alcohol. Central to the display is usually pictures of deceased family members, represented in spirit. In the worship of Santa Muerte, the ofrenda takes the form of an idol. Usually one depicted as a woman wearing a hooded robe, carrying a scythe and a globe. Different color schemes will represent different virtues or aspects of the Holy Death. This symbology is largely borrowed from medieval Spanish mythology, but the ritual itself derives from pagan worship common to the Americas and across the world. The ofrenda dedicated to Santa Muerte with her statues also has offerings, believed as sacrifice in exchange for boons such as good luck or protection from harm. Dedicated practitioners will perform blood sacrifice rituals, using animals such as pigs and chickens. Human sacrifice is known, and relatively common where criminals practice the religion. They do this with a fierce and zealous belief that this can protect them from the schemes of their enemies, protect drug shipments crossing U.S. customs but above all else they use Santa Muerte as a spiritual tool to enforce cohesion of their organization. Fear has been a driving force for controlling and subduing individuals initiated into any secret society or ancient mystery school. So too does the modern incarnation of such phenomena use these tools to brainwash and dominate those who work below them in the hierarchy. Jesús Malverde, possibly born as Jesús Juarez Mazo, sometimes known as the "Cjuba Lord", "angel of the poor", or the "narco-saint", is a folklore hero in the Mexican state of Sinaloa. He was of Yoreme and Spanish heritage. He is a "Robin Hood" figure who was supposed to have stolen from the rich to give to the poor. Malverde is a popular Mexican folk saint known as the unofficial patron saint of drug traffickers. Malverde also is known as the "Generous Bandit" and the "Angel of the Poor," said Robert Almonte, a law enforcement consultant who has extensively researched the "narco-saint" phenomenon who gave presentations at the El Paso seminar. The Mexican folk saint is popular with those in the drug trade but "you have people who are not involved in criminal activity that pray to him as the Angel of the Poor," Almonte explained. Malverde is depicted with black hair, a black mustache and looks a little like Clark Gable with a neckerchief. He is sometimes depicted holding money. His image can be found on everything from religious figurines, votive candles, key chains and T-shirts. Malverde is not recognized as a saint by the Catholic Church. The Malverde legends say he was a Mexican Robin Hood-type bandit who stole from the rich and gave to the poor in the late 1800s and early 1900s in the Pacific Coast state of Sinaloa. Sinaloa is the traditional fatherland for many groups in the region's drug trade that grew into the Mexican drug cartels. Drug traffickers adopted Malverde because they see themselves in the good-hearted bandit, Almonte said. “The Mexican cartels acknowledge 'we are doing a bad thing but more importantly we’re doing a bad thing for the right reasons; we’re helping the poor.' So, they adopted him as a patron saint," Almonte said. Almonte is a former U.S. marshal for the Western District of Texas and a retired deputy chief with the El Paso Police Department. He started researching saints revered by Mexican drug traffickers while working as a police narcotics officer in the 1980s. There is debate whether Juan Malverde ever actually existed. According to legends, Malverde was a bandit named Jesus Juárez Mazo, who wore green as camouflage to surprise and rob wealthy victims and would give to the poor in the mountains of Sinaloa. The Mexican government eventually caught Malverde and supposedly hanged him May 3, 1909. In the legend, miracles, such as finding lost objects, were attributed to Malverde. Believers pray to him for good luck, protection, health and other needs. The name Malverde is a combination of the Spanish words for "bad" (mal) and "green" (verde). By the 1970s, Mexican drug traffickers had adopted Malverde as their "patron saint," Almonte said. The legend of the folk saint was celebrated in ballads. "De Culiacan a Colombia, que viva Jesús Malverde, este santo del colgado que ha traido buena suerte," sang Los Cadetes de Linares on the "Corrido de Jesus Malverde." The ballad says, "From Culiacan to Colombia, long live Jesus Malverde, the hanged saint has brought good luck." Almonte said he first learned of Malverde in the early 1990s as belief in the folk saint spread deep into the United States. “I began noticing that not only was he popular along the Southwest border area, but I was getting officers in Minnesota, officers in Iowa, Wisconsin, telling me they are encountering Jesus Malverde in drug cases," Almonte said. USA PAISA PRISON CULTURE & PAISA GANGS This part of Paisa roleplay is often overlooked for some reason, but it can actually be the funnest experience you’ll ever have when it comes to Paisa roleplay. See the thing is, people see “Paisa” as a faction concept and automatically think about drug Cartel cells but don’t think about prison gangs or street gangs like the Border Brothers 22 prison gang, Barrio Azteca 21 prison gang, Paisa Tango prison gang, Varrio Paisa 5/Hill 22 street gang, Krazy Ass Paisas 16 street gang etc. But need not worry, I’m here to help you with that today! The first thing to do when looking at USA based Prison Organizations and Street Gangs is understand the fundamentals of it, and honestly? If you know how to roleplay Sureño, Norteño, Crip or Blood, then learning to roleplay a Paisa Street gang won’t be that hard. I won’t be writing how you should do gang roleplay here, because I’m sure there’s plenty of guides on the forums about that, instead I’m going to directly focus on what a Paisa Prison Organization or Street Gang is. The thing when it comes to Paisa Prison Organizations and Street Gangs is that you need to understand they don’t operate the same way most USA based Prison Organizations and Street Gangs do. Let me start off by explaining the USA Paisa Prison Organizations first, since it’ll get it out of the way and easier for you to understand one by one instead of me jumping back and forth nonstop between the both of them. Paisa (Mexican National) Prison Organizations in the United States of America are very different from your normal everyday Prison Organizations like the Aryan Brotherhood, Mexican Mafia, Nuestra Familia, Black Mafia Family, KUMI 415, Family Affiliated Irish Mafia etc. The reasoning behind this is because most of the inmates in State Penitentiaries and Federal Penitentiaries that rock the Paisa banner are immigrants that are locked up, or 1st/2nd generation Mexican-Americans with direct links to immigrants. Many organizations like the Paisa Tangos, Barrio Azteca 21, Border Brothers 22, Borrachos, etc were all formed by Mexican Nationals that came to the United States of America and ended up being locked up at either State or Federal level within the country. Although there’s a Paisa presence throughout the United States of America, the dominant presence is on the West Coast and Southern area of the United States as it’s where most ended up during lockup. Many Paisa Prison Organizations are also subsidiary drug distribution hubs for Cartels and are used on the outside with their individual crews to market and distribute narcotics at times. Paisa Prison Organizations, especially on the West Coast are usually allied and friendly with the Mexican Mafia due to cultural drives. Border Brothers Prison Gang The Border Brothers gang was founded in 1989 by Sergio Gonzalez-Martinez and others in Tijuana, Mexico and spread into San Andreas in 1990; recruiting criminal illegal immigrants in barrios across San Andreas, Arizona, Nevada, Denver and Tijuana Mexico. The organization runs the bulk of their operations through San Diego, Los Santos, Fresno and Oakland. The Border Brothers will often identify themselves through the letters BB or the number 22; as well as 2=B or XXII. It’s also not uncommon to see the depiction of a jaguar-shaped Aztec warrior god’s head, Ocelotl, encircled by flames, with eight elongated flames to depict their affiliation. Their clothing is another means to identify them, where members will most often dress in black or blue clothes, with bandanas. The Border Brothers are classified as one of the fastest growing STGs (Security Threat Groups), and are considered to have the highest and most validated members by the Arizona Department of Corrections, Rehabilitation & Re-entry from their latest report. As such, they seem to work under two distinct branches: street and prison. The prison gang operates under a paramilitary structure of President, Vice President, generals, lieutenants, sergeants and soldiers, whilst the street gangs are more loosely organized. Some of the most important things that separates Border Brothers from other Latino criminal organizations is their utilization of a high number of “Paisas”; Mexican Nationals who live or become incarcerated in the US, usually on drug trafficking charges across country borders. This allowed the organization to operate under the radar by generating less controversy compared to Sureños and Norteños. This is achieved by staying quiet in the criminal sphere, keeping strictly to themselves, only speaking Spanish and not claiming territory (Pogrebin, Qualitative Approaches to Criminal Justice: Perspectives from the Field, 2002, Page 306). In regard to race, an article published by East Bay Times (Scott Johnson, May 2011) states that the Border Brothers tend to accept people of all races. An “OG” (original gangster) Border Brother was documented stating the following: “We don’t discriminate, if they’re down to die for us, they’re welcome. It doesn’t matter if he’s black or white, anything. But if you turn your back on us, that’s another story.” Pogrebin also quotes another testimony stating the following: “The Border Brothers don’t want to have anything to do with Sureños-Norteños. They keep out of that ‘cause it’s not our fighting and all of that is stupid... Either you are a Chicano or you’re not. There is no sense of being separated (Case 3).” (Qualitative Approaches to Criminal Justice: Perspectives from the Field, 2002, Page 306) P16 Prison Gang The paisas 16 are mostly composed of Mexican Nationals who were arrested while crossing the border into the United States illegally. The majority of them are not into criminal activity in the West Coast but they do operate as a gang in Texas under the "Tango Mexicles" banner. In the union, members refer to themselves as "paisano" or just "paisa". Their affiliation is considered "light" (strictly to prison) and their initiation requirements vary from each facility. The gang was mainly formed to seek independence from what they perceived as "negative" prison gangs that operated under the "blood in-blood out" vision which states that the only way to leave the gang is by death. Although their major strength resides within the federal prison system of the United States, it is also believed that members from the "Mexicles Union" have presence in many other states and that their membership could go from 20,000 to 23,000 validated individuals. In the state of Texas they formed their own "Tango" chapter known as "Tango Mexicles" and a lot of its members are Salvadoran, Colombian, Guatemalan and Honduran amongst other Latin-Americans. The number 16 represents the letter P of the alphabet and members of the gang might wear some Mexican culture tattoos such as the Mexican eagle, the Mexican coat of arms or the "Hecho en México" (Made in Mexico) official commercial logo eagle as well as the portraits of Mexico's Independence heroes with the likes of Emiliano Zapata and Francisco Villa. PRM (Partido Revolucionario Mexicano) The PRM was founded in 1987-1988 in TDCJ’s Coffield Unit by six inmates who wanted to protect themselves from other offenders and prison groups. Until 1994, the PRM was comprised of only Mexican nationals and individuals of Mexican descent. After 1994, recruitment was opened to individuals of Latin descent from Central and South America. In July 2005, TDCJ formally identified the PRM as an STG. Members of the PRM identify themselves as “Borrachos.” The PRM tattoo often incorporates the letters "PRM" and/or the emblem on the Mexican flag (i.e., eagle, snake, cactus, and half wreath). The words "Estados Unidos Mexicanos" may be added above the eagle. The number “6” is a code number used to identify membership (Note: There are six letters in the word “Mexico” and “Mezcal”) and the tattoo “P31” is also used (“R” is the 18th letter of the alphabet and “M” is the 13th letter; thus “P” + 18 + 13 = P31). In addition, since the group has used the word “borracho” (Spanish for “drunk”) to denote membership, some members may bear a tattoo of a Mexican male sitting on the ground, wearing a sombrero tilted forward, with a bottle of Mezcal or Tequila in his hand or beside him. Tangos The Tangos are one of the fastest growing groups in Texas, both within the prison system and on the streets, and are attaining near fad status. The term “Tango” is derived from Spanish slang and indicates a “town or hometown clique”. The term also refers to the letter T in the International Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet, commonly known as the NATO phonetic alphabet or the ICAO phonetic alphabet to indicate that the group operates in the whole of Texas. Membership is usually voluntary and based on the geographic location where the offender resides. The rules governing Tango membership are less stringent than those required for STGs, which have historically adhered to a “blood in-blood out” philosophy. Tangos also abide by an existing set of basic written rules that specifically outline the expectations of their members. The Tangos and their behavior within the prison system are more consistent with other self-protection groups; however, the Tangos have also evolved into groups that, because of their large numbers, have successfully challenged the more established STGs. Presently, TDCJ’s Security Threat Group Management Office monitors the Tango groups, but does not recognize them as a validated STG. The four largest Tango groups, known collectively as the “Four Horsemen,” are “Houstone” from Houston; “D-Town” from Dallas; “Foritos” from Fort Worth; and “ATX” or “Capirucha” from Austin. Other Tango groups include the “Vallucos” from the Rio Grande Valley; the West Texas Tangos (WTX) from West Texas and the Texas Panhandle; “Corpitos” from Corpus Christi; “San Anto” or “Orejones” from San Antonio; and “EPT” from El Paso. Some Tangos may also identify themselves as being “Tango Blast” (TB), which is not so much a separate organization as it is an indication that the offender has participated in heightened criminal activity on behalf of the organization. The term “blasting” refers to involvement in violent or disruptive criminal behavior against other gang members or criminal justice personnel, particularly inside the Texas prison system. Most Tangos who claim TB membership come from the Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth, and Houston areas. Tango structure and leadership vary in and out of prison. Within the prison system, Tangos elect a representative for each unit, known as a “Spokesman,” as well as a designated speaker for each pod, wing, or dorm who reports directly to the Spokesman. Outside of prison, the Tango groups appear to be more loosely organized. They operate in small groups and cells without a well-defined structure or identified leader. Tangos are involved in a variety of criminal activity, including auto theft, burglaries, narcotics trafficking, illegal alien smuggling, home invasions, robberies, kidnappings, and homicide—all offenses that have historically been committed by STGs. Furthermore, as a result of technological advancements and easier access to automated information, law enforcement can expect to see an increase in a wide variety of computer-related crimes by the newer and technologically-savvy gang members, including identity theft, fraud, and other financial crimes. The Internet has also provided gangs an avenue of communication and self-promotion that has not been available to them in the past. With the younger generation’s increasing attraction to living the “Thug Life” or becoming a “G,” these groups will continue to pose a legitimate threat to the public, law enforcement, and criminal justice personnel at all levels. Tango members can be identified by their tattoos, which usually depict a hometown sports team and/or the team logo, a city skyline, area code numbers representing their hometowns, or the slang term for their hometown. Tangos who claim to be TB members may also use the tattoo “16-20-2” to represent the 16th, 20th, and 2nd letters of the alphabet, or “PTB,” which stands for “Puro Tango Blast.” The Paisa Tango Mexicles was formed in the Texas prison system by a group of Mexican nationals and immigrants who banded together to protect themselves from being recruited or assaulted by other STGs. Although members of this gang may be tattooed with the word “Mexicle” or “Mexicles,” the term is not used exclusively by them. The word “Mexicle” is a term used to describe a Mexican citizen and thus is sometimes found in tattoos worn by members of other gangs, such as the Partido Revolucionario Mexicano (PRM). The next one is Paisa (Mexican National) Street Gangs in the United States of America. This is a very complex subject to touch on, mainly because gangs like Sureños, Norteños, Crips and Bloods all have Paisas as members internally, so what I’m going to do here is touch on overall Paisa Street Gangs like Varrio Paisa 5/Hill 22, Krazy Ass Paisas 16 and such. See alongside your standard Mexican-American street gangs, African-American street gangs and Asian-American street gangs, you also have Latin-American street gangs that exist in the United States of America, Mexican Nationals being the dominant membership most of the time inside of these street gangs. They’re normally used at street level for Paisa Prison Organizations and drug Cartels, to either distribute drugs at street level or handle USA based hits and such. There’s not many Paisa Street gangs that actually exist, at least to my knowledge, so it the concept in itself is quite rare and underrated as it’s often overlooked when Street Gang roleplay is considered. Paisa Street Gangs typical are a hybrid of organized crime and street crime mixed into one, sort of like Armenian Power 13 (Although using AP13 as an example can be taken the wrong way, as they’re more of a Mob) / Mara Salvatrucha 13 if you were to use it as a comparison, since they’re kind of deemed a street gang by the authorities, but their main drive is organized criminal activities in the end. But all in all, when they hit the yard, they claim Paisa and run Paisa. USA BASED PAISA PLENIPOTENTIARIES There are many different transnational criminal organizations operating with the cartels who constitute their own transnational criminal organizations. Some of these include Mexican street gangs who have migrated across the U.S. border to make their smuggling activities independant. These include the Paisas, Border Brothers and the Xalisco Boys. The latter are very well known for having revolutionized the drug retail business for such organizations, providing cheap prescription medication, heroin and other narcotics without the use of open air drug markets, instead delivering directly to the customer. This allowed the Xalisco Boys to spread across many states. Although the Xalisco Boys are somewhat more complicated, as not all of them are deemed to be Paisanos and operate under the Paisa banner, in fact it's quite the opposite where many of the USA based Xalisco Boys; especially in California, tend to fall in line with Californian chapter of the Mexican Mafia (EME). While some started as street or prison gangs under a cartel's control, most have evolved to enjoy a great level of autonomy and even independence. The native peoples of Nueva Leon have historically had no such ties, all street gangs and competition is dominated and absorbed first by the Zetas, then the Cartel de Noreste. Most cartels provide their own drug trafficking, loading vehicles in their home regions and ferrying them through U.S points of entry along the border, or have it shipped out of Mexican ports. They also employ the street/prison gangs to facilitate this, the dual-citizenship of many newer members from the United States serving them well in crossing border checkpoints. For example, while the prison gang Border Brothers (22) operate a huge network of smugglers, distributors and retailers across the entirety of California working as a pipeline for the Arellano-Félix Organization, they also provide the same to the Sinaloa factions while retaining their own independence. The past decade has shown how important border towns such as El Paso, Nogales and Tijuana are for the larger Mexican cartels such as the Jalisco Cartel, Noreste cartel and the Sinaloa cartel. From these places they flood the local markets of BB, BA and Sureno street gangs among many more with high quality heroin, cocaine, fentanyl and methamphetamines. Although outdated, this map is a perfect representation of how drug routes are intended to work And how cartels have areas of influence. Direct cartel operations and business in the United States is run according to hub-and-spoke principles, where all product comes across the border to a centralized warehouse or network, this is the hub. From there it is distributed out towards individual actors or satellite organizations within the U.S. operation like the Border Brothers gang. This is known as a spoke, where it is further distributed to customers. Proceeds travel back through the same channels, arriving at the hub. These hubs are frequently located on the U.S. side of the border, in places like Los Angeles, Chicago and El Paso. Other important hubs for the largest players are Phoenix, Houston, Miami, and Atlanta. The key to their success and longevity has been to follow the same sophisticated routines for a long time. All major places of import relies on these cartel controlled cities, ideally situated on a hub of intersecting interstates like the I-10 or the I-65. This combined with their extreme levels of discretion while operating in the U.S. has allowed them to continue using the same hubs for decades. While there are instances Mexican groups take their extreme violence to the public eye like the kidnappings in San Diego by Los Palillos, who started their life under the Tijuana cartel but split after the murder of their leader El Palillo, this remains extremely rare. In most, if not all cases this type of behavior leads to the downfall of all involved. The threat all cartels come under by being labeled narco-terrorists is something resting heavily on the minds of every individual involved. The few who get away with this behavior are exclusively part of low level street gang activity, who partake in this seemingly ever increasing phenomenon of gun violence. Likewise, it is extremely rare for an organized, involved individual to engage police in gun battle. This will generally only ever happen in moments of severe desperation, as a last ditch effort for their leaders to escape apprehension. Lower profile members might sporadically have confrontations with law enforcement but this usually results in that person's death or large scale manhunts that make it impossible to operate within any semblance of society. When it comes to the United States of America and groups operating under Cartel banners to actively distribute narcotics, launder money, transport money, smuggle people in and smuggle weapons back to Mexico, there’s a huge list of subsidiary plenipotentiaries inside of the United States of America. The biggest thing to remember when it comes to USA based plenipotentiaries though is, most of the operatives inside of that USA based group aren’t official members of the Cartel itself that’s located in Mexico but instead use their name to advertise and market as a strategy for Narconomic Development. Los Tigres (AFO/CAF) Los Chapitos (CDS) La Linea (NCDJ) Border Brothers 22 (AFO/CDS) Barrio Azteca Vieja Escuela (CDS) Barrio Azteca Nuevo Escuela (NCDJ) Grupo Ensenada (AFO/CAF) Tango (CDN/NCDJ/CDG) PRM (CDS/CDN) WHAT IS A PLENIPOTENTIARY? Plenipotentiaries are basically sub-factors of Cartels from Mexico, that mainly operate in foreign land such as the European and American continent. In the late 2010's they became really popular factors for Cartels to distribute narcotics across the foreign nations, and in the U.S.A especially. Normally plenipotentiaries are made up of countless different crews under one major dominant cell inside of a state. The dominant cell's leader acts as a representative and spokesperson between the plenipotentiary and the Cartel in Mexico itself, and may not always hold direct membership to the Cartel they're distributing for. That's a common misunderstanding, that you get "made" into a Cartel in Mexico and distribute for them. This isn't true, the plenipotentiaries in the U.S.A might use the Cartel's banner name as a way to conduct business since it may hold weight, but 95% of the time the operatives in that plenipotentiary aren't members at all. PLENIPOTENTIARIES ONLY RECRUIT MEXICANS: There's a common misunderstanding that you must roleplay Mexican inside of a Narco cell that's U.S.A based. This couldn't be further from the truth, in fact quite the opposite... a lot of lower ranking operatives in the U.S.A may be of white, black, Asian, and Middle-eastern descent. Now of course the main core of the membership will consist of Mexicans, but roleplaying non-Mexican isn't far fetched aslong as your character doesn't want to rise above middle-management as that's probably the highest they'd ever achieve. AMERICA IS AMERICA, NOT MEXICO! What I mean by this is that people need to stop acting like it's Mexico. Narco operatives who operate in the U.S.A fear one thing more than getting punished by Mexican Cartels themselves, and that fear? Going to prison in the U.S.A. On LSRP's SAMP server I constantly seen people carrying guns like a gang-banger, acting reckless etc. Look, I'ma be real... traffickers rarely carry firearms. They might have something in their house, or car, or may carry when there's high tension with another group but definitely won't carry just to carry as it's too risky if they're pulled over n stop searched for no reason. Normally there's a dedicated security crew internally in plenipotentiaries that handle all of that. Another thing is openly fighting on the streets, this is a no go. You might have rival cells go head-to-head once in a blue moon in the U.S.A, but they won't be shooting down the street with M4A1s and wasting 5 magazines, dumping them into bodies. If and when rival narco groups go to war in the U.S.A (which bare in mind is very rare), they'll treat it like any Mob hit and do it clean and fast and out of sight. But wars shouldn't happen like that anyways, because the whole point of U.S.A plenipotentiary roleplay is operating as shadow operatives under the radar. Another thing that should be understood is Cartel Cells/Plenipotentiaries in the U.S.A might be distributing on behalf of a Mexican Cartel, but in the end they're in foreign land and aren't the final say there. If a Cartel Cell is operating in California for example, chances are their people are going to serve time with the Southerner Car (Mexican Mafia) essentially. Border Brothers 22 prison gang run in chapters by state, but in California all BBs serve with the Sur Car (Not to be mistaken with Oakland BBs as they're two different things). What I'm saying is, don't big dick a Security Threat Group (STG) that by right has claim to that area of influence. FEMALES IN THE NARCO UNDERWORLD Being a female in a male dominated environment can often be challenging, and sometimes almost impossible depending on the environment at hand. The topic for this part, as you can see, is females in the narco underworld, and hopefully after reading this thoroughly you’ll understand a lot more about the complexity of the topic. To start off? We’ll start talking about mannerisms and attitude and how they affect the outcome of situations, meaning we’ll talk about the way females must act. See the thing is there has been females to reach a Narco queenpin status, but it’s very rare and you know why? Because the mannerisms greatly affect the way people see you, judge you and react to you. Not to generalize a gender, but most females don’t make it to that status because they can’t get past the first step of what I’m going to mention here. When you’re a female in the Narco underworld, you must carry yourself a certain way so as to get looks from people but also not too much looks. You need to be seen as serious, fierceless and business oriented. The issue is, not many females end up meeting this requirement and most end up being messengers or sicarias (hitwomen) as they don’t have a business oriented mindset with serious driven fierceless mindsets jammed into one big comprehension. You need to be able to sit down at a negotiation and get a perfect first impression off someone, put them into a mindset of aw-ness, if you can’t do that then you’ve already failed. Another thing I've seen with female characters in Narco concepts is, a lot of them seem to be very sexual and overly feminine. This is a very controversial topic as some might take it the wrong way, but I hate to break it to you it’s the only way to say it; roleplaying your character being overly sexual and feminine is horrendous and abysmal portrayal for someone chasing a queenpin like outcome on their character. You need to remember the Narco underworld is a male dominated environment, if there’s any hint of sluttery or whoreness from your character? You risk being seen as a plaything and not taken seriously. But being too manly can also fuck it up, as you need to meet a perfect middle ground to perfectly fit that title. Most females who’ve risen to positions of power and influence in the Narco underworld, typically end up being some of the cold hearted women you’ll ever come across as they must be twice as ruthless as the men to gain respect, but also must be business oriented to keep that respect as you can’t be seen as a violent female purely, otherwise you’re no different than a hitwoman. Next we’ll talk about fashion/dress-code, looks and emotions. This is by far something I see people always messing up with, you’d think it’d be pretty obvious but to some people it isn’t. Dressing too hoodrattish and slutty can both fuck up your chances of being taken seriously, so you must find a middle ground. It means don’t wear shit like you’re gangbanging, but don’t expose too much skin and wear stripper heels because then you’re seen as a hoe. You must dress to impress, but must also keep it toned down and stuff, best way to describe it is contemporary Western attire, business casual attire or business attire fully. You could also dress in a Buchóna fashion, which is contemporary Western attire mixed with business attire and sometimes dark vibrance attire. I’m sure you’ll find the fashion style if you research it on the internet for long enough. As for looks and emotions, I don’t like restricting character development and roleplay but honestly? Don’t overdo it with tattoos either, normally people of influence in the Narco underworld don’t even have tattoos that are exposed like that. As for emotions, I get females can get very emotional at times, but you shouldn’t… under any circumstance, show dramatic emotions publicly, it can completely ruin your reputation. You need to be levelheaded, clear minded and relaxed at almost all times. SUMMARY The summary for the guide is essentially that everything basic has been run through rather in-depth but short and straight to the point. If you knew some things said on this guide, then it shows you did your research, but we’re most definitely positive that you’ve read this and came away with learning something new that you didn’t know before. The guide was a joint-op written by @Freedom Fighter, @Nuke and @EGN. Considering not many guides on Paisa roleplay have been made, it’s understandable in the end as not many people have a lot of in-depth modernized information on the topic. We figured we should share our information and knowledge with the community to help better people who’re interested in learning about the concept! https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zhQA8v-FFk-6SsChn498gC3fAcPGaRu5R1-W69UX2jQ/edit?usp=sharing
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  11. The video below is a whistle-stop tour on how to effectively roleplay a journalist character, based on my own experiences. If listening to my voice isn’t your thing or you’d prefer some more in-depth explanations, read on: _____________________________ Part 1 – Introduction to journalist roleplay Why roleplay a journalist? Roleplaying a journalist can be incredibly rewarding and fun provided you have the right mindset for it. It’s mostly legal roleplay (though there are of course options for corruption which may spice things up a bit) and as such, it’s not for everybody. As a journalist, you’ll find your character conducting investigations, interviewing public figures, writing up their findings and potentially broadcasting them too. With commitment and consistency, your character will also likely develop a certain level of fame and recognition. I’ll say this ‘til I’m blue in the face though: journalism roleplay is meant to be fun – and that’s the main reason why you should consider it! If you try it out and don’t find it fun, maybe it’s not for you (or maybe you’re putting yourself under too much pressure – take it one step at a time). _____________________________ What type of players could this appeal to? It’s fair to say that not everyone would enjoy journalism roleplay, but here are the typical traits of the people who do: Good writers. If you’re confident in your writing ability then this can translate very well into your character’s outputs. Writing is essentially going to be your character’s job; it’s what they’ll be judged against and paid for, so you either need to be confident in your current writing ability, or committed to improving it over time. Investigators. If you like roleplaying as a nosy sleuth then journalism is right up your street. A journo can spend a long time investigating a given topic before actually writing about it, plus you’ll often find that stories have “layers” which get deeper and deeper the more the investigation continues. Risk takers. If you want the juicy stories, you’re going to have to accept that your character is likely to end up in dangerous situations. Whether that’s as simple as venturing through a dodgy neighbourhood, or more involved like trying to infiltrate an organised crime outfit, life as a journalist is not without its risks. Organised people. All that investigating and writing is great fun, but being organised will help you pull it all together. If you as a player consider yourself as organised, either in your home or working life, then this should translate well. If not, then you may find yourself getting easily frustrated with the many stories you may be investigating at any one time. Fortunately, being organised is a skill that you can quite easily work on as you go along. Those who have broad shoulders. You have to be willing to accept that yeah – sometimes people are going to love your writing, and sometimes people aren’t. Some people may see your broadcasts as useful, and others may see it as spam. You’re going to be in the firing line with someone at some point, so having broad shoulders and not taking such comments to heart is important. Naturally, it’s also important to maintain a mature attitude when genuine critique and feedback is offered. _____________________________ What type of journalists are there? In the real world, there are so many different types of journalists based on the media they’re employed in (a magazine, newspaper, radio station, TV station, social network) and the niche they may specialise in – if they’re not a mainstream reporter. On roleplay servers, I’ve typically seen journalists manifest in one of two ways: the tabloid gossip reporter and the professional reporter. The differences are probably obvious, but I’ll list them here anyway: Tabloid gossip reporter: · Typically less concerned with printing the whole truth · Focuses on sensational and dramatic stories · Embellishes for entertainment · Willing to print rumours without substance · More likely to speculate · Stronger personality · May be bias, but isn’t ashamed about it · Marmite – you’ll likely love or hate them Professional reporter: · Generally speaking, more concerned with “truthful” reporting · Sees it as their job to inform and educate · May embellish slightly, but not at the expense of integrity/believability · Less likely to print rumours · Not likely to speculate · Generally try to present an unbiased ‘front’ even if there is underlying bias · Reserved, more serious personality. Arguably a little more forgettable? · They’re just the messenger – you’re not likely to have a strong opinion on them. You may choose either path for your character, or perhaps a mishmash of both. I’ve seen some really effective reporters who get the balance just right; they report on serious things but do so with personality. _____________________________ How do you report on an RP server? There are many ways and much of the time, it’s dependent on a few factors: · The capabilities of the script. Although there are no news factions planned at launch, it’s likely that scripts will be added later depending on level of interest. · Whether you’re a lone wolf or part of a company. Lone wolves have historically tended to post articles in an ‘internet’ section on the forums, or similar. Some have set up their own separate websites before as well, or focused on using in-character social media. In companies, you may have access to dedicated websites and broadcasting capabilities. · Whether you’re willing to speak up. For the brave souls who aren’t afraid of a little voiced roleplay, you can also consider recording news updates yourself and posting them. In some cases, they could even be featured as regular updates on player-ran XM stations. Really cool if you’re willing to do it, here’s an example: So with this in mind, here are your primary options for journalism outputs: · Internet articles · Forum articles · Forum magazines (more in-depth pieces, covered later) · In-game broadcasts (once the capability is there) · Pre-recorded radio updates (when you’re willing to do some voice RP) _____________________________ Part 2: Getting started Character setup Journalists in real life often come from a variety of backgrounds, so it’s not entirely necessary to have a full list of qualifications or previous experience. I’d advise you to make decisions for your character based on your own understanding/mastery of the English Language – if you feel like you still have some learning to do, it might be best not to give them 1st Degree Honours in English Language. If you’re feeling confident that you can deliver a character that demonstrates such prowess in writing and communicating, these are some of the subjects your character may have studied: · English Language · Media Studies · Journalism and reporting · Communications · Public Relations · Marketing There are more, but you get the gist. Other considerations for your character are: · How old are they? Young ones are more likely to be rough around the edges, but also more likely to be daredevils and risk takers. Time and burnt fingers tend to teach seasoned journalists when it’s best to back off from a situation, or let something go. · What’s their personality? If you’re roleplaying a gossipy reporter, it makes sense for your character to have a strong and outgoing personality. For serious reporters, you tend to find that these individuals are slightly more reserved and professional. · What’s their goal? Most people in the real world go into journalism because they’re driven to it for some reason. It’s not a massive money-maker, particularly when low down in the ranks, so reasons tend to be “the pursuit of truth” or “holding public figures accountable” and suchlike. · What’s their moral compass? Is your character going to play by the rules, or ‘break some eggs to make some omelettes’? Are they going to accept bribes? Are they going to let their own prejudices affect how they report on things? All important questions to answer about your character – and don’t forget this can all change over time! _____________________________ Your character’s first steps So you’ve made your character and are ready to get going with roleplaying a journalist. Getting started can be pretty intimidating – but it needn’t be. Here are a few top tips: · Just start writing. It doesn’t matter whether what you write will eventually be published; you can spend too long trying to overanalyse what to write and then never actually end up putting pen to paper. Write about anything your character sees during their day, and see if you can make it entertaining or interesting. · Get out and drive around. You’re bound to stumble upon something potentially of interest; a robbery, a fire, a business opening, someone with an interesting story to tell… but you’ll never know if your character stays stuck in their apartment all day (or offline!) · Start establishing a network. Get out there and meet people, make sure your character is making new friends and contacts all the time. Be sure that they know to contact you if they come across anything interesting – and thank them if they ever do get in touch with something. · Find your character’s tone of voice. This only really comes with consistent writing – but you’ll soon find that you as a player likely have your own quirk to how you write. Make the decision on how you’re going to inject your character’s personality and goals into their writing; just because it’s how you would write something, doesn’t mean it’s how they would. · Publish! If it’s on the forums, get some articles up. If you’re in a news company and youhave the permissions, get some broadcasts done. If you’re producing voice clips, fire up the microphone and get it sorted. · Promote. Whether it’s using in-game advertising, social media or in other parts of the forums; make sure people know where to read your articles or find your broadcasts (or logs/records of your broadcasts, if it’s in-game). That’s all there is to it. Rinse, repeat and keep getting better as you go. _____________________________ What can you write about? There are a wide variety of topics that your character can choose to write about – much of it is dependent on what’s happening in the world, but there are other options which are almost constantly available to you if it’s a ‘slow news day’. Things to report on as they happen: · Crime. Keep an eye out for car chases and police activity. In most situations, your character is likely to be asked to keep a safe distance. Depending on how you’re roleplaying the character, you may decide to abide by these requests, or not. But remember – keeping the police on your character’s good side (at least in the beginning) might lead them to be less resistant to any requests you make in the future. · Fires and other disasters. Building on fire? That’s newsworthy. Where did it happen, how did it happen, is anyone hurt, did anyone die, who’s involved, was it deliberate? So many questions, and it’s your character’s job to find out and publish the answers. · Political updates. These can come from the Government, or from the legal services which may have their own press offices. It’s important to keep an eye on what these institutions publish, so that you can analyse it and potentially repurpose it for your reporting. · Events. Sometimes the Government or other organisations hold events like races, careers fairs and so on. It’s always good to attend these events and do a write-up afterwards; both players and their characters would no doubt appreciate reading about anything they’ve missed. Other subjects you can write on at any time: · Business reviews. Obviously, it’s dependent on the business being open, but this is also a great way to get to know who the influential people are in the city. Be careful though, your character will have a choice to make: do they remain truthful even if it pisses off the owner, or do they chum up to the owner and constantly post good reviews just to increase their network? Both have pros and cons! · Interviews with public figures. This is where the “not pissing people off too much” part comes in. If your character has maintained positive relations with certain people of interest, or the businesses they work for, they may be willing to have an exclusive interview. You’re then free to set the terms of what the interview covers, and if it goes well, they may be willing to come back for more in the future. · Area guides and informative pieces. People who are new to the city would no doubt find value in learning about the hottest spots in town – not just businesses, but “places to be” and “things to do”. Think about what players would find interesting to read; this is fine, so long as you then write it for their characters and from your character’s perspective. · A specialist subject. Perhaps your character is interested in fashion, or cars. Find a niche that others would be interested in reading about, along with something to say about it (perhaps a new fashion trend), and give it a go. · Opinion pieces. If you’re happy with your character losing a bit of their objectivity, then it’s fine for them to publish their opinion on a given matter as well – similar to how columnists and contributors do in real life. Pick a subject or a recent event, then analyse it through your character’s eyes. There are no doubt more – please let me know and I’ll add them! A few important points: do not make things up completely. I have generally found that very people enjoy reading things which never actually happened – for obvious reasons. Surprisingly however I did receive a lot of requests for this in my time roleplaying a journalist; mainly because someone wanted me to publish a character’s “backstory” and establish them as some kind of badass. I personally advise against this; it’s up to the players to promote their own backstory. Their character’s reputation is then theirs to make and shape. Perhaps they’ll do this by working with you in the game, which is great, I just wouldn’t accept “this is what happened in Liberty City one week ago” type requests. _____________________________ Part 3: Top tips for improving your journalism roleplay I did journo roleplay for a good couple of years, running news factions as well as doing my own things as an independent. I learnt a lot, so if you want to take your RP to the next level, here are a few tips from me: · Remain consistent. Set yourself goals for how many “outputs” you’ll produce in a given time frame, but don’t put yourself under undue pressure. It’s far better to consistently produce 1 article per week, than suddenly do 5 articles one week and none the next. Consistency is better than volume. · Have a brand and a personality. If your character works for a news company, you already have a corporate brand. But give them a personality too; make people enjoy hearing updates from your character. Make them interesting, give them depth. · Never stop getting your character’s name out there. It takes time to become known as “the news person”, but once you get there, finding stories becomes a hell of a lot easier. Why? Because many people will actually start sending YOU the stories rather than you having to go out and find them. Ironically this is how things work in real life: PR executives throw stories at journalists, and they get to decide what to use and what not to use. · Connect with media relations early. Most of the legal factions have their own dedicated press office or media relations department. Ask to be put in touch with them early and they’ll no doubt help your character along their journey... provided you aren’t always printing controversial stuff about them. · Don’t be afraid to piss people off. This may seem contradictory to the above point, but it isn’t: generally speaking, most people value the truth and can see through obvious brown-nosing. Good journalists are known for thoroughly investigating and informing the public, even if this ruffles feathers. · To earn money, you need advertisers. You’re not likely to have much interest in the beginning, but if you’re consistent and you can prove that you have readership, then there will be a demand to advertise with your publication or on your channel. Keep at it, and the money will come. · Put in extra effort. If you have the time and are willing to do so, think about how you could really show off your character’s journalism. Perhaps you could create your own magazine on Photoshop, or take the step into doing voiced reports, or something like that. It’s easier to stand out from the crowd when you do something different. · HAVE FUN! It’s far, far too easy with legal roleplay to fall into the trap of treating this like a second job. It is absolutely not meant to be a second job. You’re playing LSRP to have fun, and you should never feel pressurised like you may do in a real life studying or work situation. If you ever feel like this, it may be time to take a break. Often in the past, this has come as a result of players or their characters criticizing my work; it takes a lot of maturity and some broad shoulders to consistently rise above that. If it gets a bit much, don’t worry at all about taking it slow. Your sanity and enjoyment should, as ever, be the key driving factor here. _____________________________ I hope you found my guide to roleplaying a journalist interesting – I would love to hear your feedback, comments and suggestions likewise if there are any journo RPers out there who have additional ideas to add on, let me know and I can consider putting them in here too. UPDATE: I've started a discussion on how the Government can support certain types of roleplay, including media and journalism. If you'd like to join in, take a look here:
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  12. E/S Insane Crip Gang The Insane Crips Gang [ICG], also known as the Insane Crips [IC], are a predominately African-American criminal street gang on the East Side of Vespucci Beach. The Insane Crips are located in Central Vespucci Beach, however their presence can be seen on Vitus(21st St.) & Cortes(23rd St.) Street. The Insane Crips are under the 3x card, identifying as Trays in their gang structure. They're known to loiter, mostly at night in a several block radius around 2100 Street. They've gained a reputation from their earlier days for being ruthless and arrogant in their neighborhood. Their primary color are black and grey, known to don Raider's apparel to represent their gang. They have three main cliques, with the Baby Insanes being the most active subset due to gentrification and blood shed the older cliques had endured. Despite the gentrification throughout Vespucci Beach, the Insane Crips were able to remain their dominance throughout their feuds with rival street gangs and criminal activity. Background & History The Insane Crips Gang formed in a alley way on 2200 Street in 1975. During these times groups arounds Vespucci Beach were catching onto politics down from South Central LS. The Insanes put the Crips on a pedestal in Vespucci Beach, already having a notorious reputation between the tight knit group. Coming from section 8 housing and food stamps, the rise of the street gang was due to poverty and discrimination. The Crips as a whole needed something to identify themselves with, as programs like the Boy Scouts weren't achievable at the time. In 1969 two Black Panther Party members were murdered in their sleep in Chicago, the same year the Cripping movement started. As the Cripping movement was still on the rise, they emerged in criminal activities, forming their first clique, the Big Insanes. Their reputation grew quick as the crime spiked in their area, adding to the stats at the time in Vespucci Beach. Their participation in numerous activities consisted of robbery, extortion, burglary, drug trafficking, and murder. They're notoriously known in Vespucci Beach, living up to the name Insane as they applied it in their politics and gang culture. They looked up to representation Vespucci Beach, being the first major Crip gangs originated there. Most members from the Big Insanes, known as ICG are original members from the first generation. The 1980's seen the rise of the crack era, as the Insanes soon followed suit to the newest trend. Crack brought the incentive of providing a different type of lifestyle the Insanes Crips crazed for. This attracted more residents from the neighborhood to join the gang, allowing the Insane Crips Gang's turf to expand. This also included female membership, cliqued "Insane Angels", was formed around the mid 1980's. It's known the females were just as active as their male counterparts, carrying firearms, getting into fights, and even participating in drive by shootings. The Young Foundation Crew(YFC) was soon followed, originating on 1600 street. This clique consisted of gang members mostly from their second generation. Around this time, the Insane Crips were also allied with Rollin 20s Crips, with 20s being hustlers in the area at the time. Their hoods were closed knitted at the time based off family ties and neighboring areas between the two. The Insanes and the Rollins used to participate in neighborhood conventions and family activities, until family became the reason for the two gangs beefing. A fight between families within the two gangs erupted with a Rollin 20s member losing their life, creating a wave of lives lost to follow after. Despite high tensions from both sides, they had a common rival in the Vespucci Longos 13. Longos, becoming one of the most hated gangs in Vespucci Beach. This tension from rivals seen shootouts daily, mainly due to the drug trade that littered Vespucci Beach. The Insane Crips had numerous crack houses spanning from 1600 to 2100 Street, during the height of the crack era. They used alley ways and dead ends in their neighborhood in order to strategically deal due to the war on drugs at the time. The ICG's were able to create and sustain efficient drug trafficking routes as their area of operations was nearby a freeway. This enabled the Insane Crips Gang to venture out to other hoods to move their product. This only increased the bloodshed, as the Insanes increased their feud various Sureno sets nearby, with a string of Blood and Piru sets outside Vespucci Beach at the time. During the mid 1980's, the Rollin 60's Neighborhood Crips and the Eight Tray Gangster Crips became full-fledge enemies. Neighboring Crip gangs needed to pledge allegiance to a side, as the 60's adapted as Deuces(2x) and the Eight Tray Gangster Crips adapted as the Trays(3x). Gangs aligned themselves to either card as the feud spilled out to surrounding neighborhoods. The Insane Crip Gang identified with Trays, aligning them to the ongoing feud as their rivals increased. This seen others pick sides likes the West Coast Crips and Rollin 20s Crips align with Deuce(2x). This rivalry is the first Crip on Crip rivalry, igniting a deadly trend that's ongoing between different Crip sets as they beefed or fell out with each other. Despite them choosing a side, the Insane Crips have their own demographic, politics, and structure, leaving them to focus on their beefs around Vespucci Beach. The late 1980's seen a bitter feud between the Insane Crips Gang and Rollin 20s Crip, as their alliance erupted, creating bloodshed on both sides. Despite both gangs having family ties, seen a deadly gang war between them both as they competed for territory as the drug trade started taking a decline. The ICG's started to focus on burglary and extortion, staking out neighboring areas they felt they can turn a profit. They were known to resourcefully use pagers and phones as it heightened their communication when conducting illegal activities. The 1990's was a rough period for the Insane Crips Gang, as gang inductions and blood shed with rivals seen their numbers stagger. Gang territory started to adjust as the Insane Crips Gang started to detract from 1600 Street. The waging feuds the Insanes were in caused the gang to be more tight knit as their presence remained on 2100 Street. To add to that, the riot in 1992 seen chaos throughout the city, as Vespucci Beach suffered as homes and business were looted. A con to this down the line seen the spread of gentrification throughout Vespucci Beach. As the city took a time to recover, majority of the members didn't see gentrification being a issue it now is today. The Insanes were forced to adapt to more strategic methods of operating like before, as they remained a deadly gang despite their membership outside decreased due to the war on drugs. The operation against the Insane Crips Gang seen a vast majority of different Departments participating as it became one of the biggest drug busts in the 1990's. During the mid 1990's-2000s, seen the Baby Insane Crips formed, being their third clique as it represents their 3rd generation. Despite the problems the ICG's faced, the Baby Insanes took from their older counterparts, as they remained ruthless to rivals around surrounding areas on 2300 Street. The 1990's has the mark one of the lowest periods for the Insanes, though it didn't last as the Insane Crips had to adapt towards their criminal activity. The 2000's approaching seen 30% of housing in Vespucci Beach being affordable to either the middle or upper class. Those housing units in the area under section 8 housing either refurbished their apartments and relocated those to a different area nearby. At the time, the Insane Crips Gang weren't as affected compared to neighboring gangs but the gentrification soon caught up with Vespucci Beach. The new generation of Insanes didn't hesitate to involve themselves in criminal activity, remaining their ruthlessness despite their demographic changing. Gentrification brought more businesses and expensive housing, shifting towards a higher market in class. Vespucci Beach has always had a tourist attraction, but gentrification in the mid 2000's played a part with the tourism we see now in Vespucci Beach. New neighbors started to call Vespucci home. casting gangs to move more accordingly as policing raised in certain areas. This even heightened the gang injunctions in the area, as they spiked for all gangs in Vespucci Beach at the time. This didn't hold the Insanes back, as they participated in robbery, extortion, and drug trafficking throughout this period. The new generation started to adapt, loitering more outside at night due to the streets not being filled with tourists. A positive from all this was the drug sales throughout this period. New neighbors and tourists brought a higher percentage of revenue to the gang, especially around the holidays as most people in Vespucci Beach had money to splurge with. Most gangs in the area took their time to handle their business after the tourists cleared up, normally at night. Their fierce rivalry with the Longo 13 didn't slow down, as the feud continued whenever the two gangs crossed paths. Their tension with the Rollin 20's Crip took the back burner a few times, but emerged shortly after despite the two gangs having family ties. This didn't hold the gang back from business as they still operated around 2100 and 2300 Street. The Baby Insanes soon adopted apparel from the Cleveland Indians, wearing grey, blue and red as their primary colors. Throughout this time, the Baby Insanes had a higher presence outside while some of the older members focused on their music careers for the gang. This helped add some revenue to the street organized gang, providing a avenue towards legal money. As the Insane Crips looked at sufficient ways to survive longevity wise, gentrification was taking it's toll around Vespucci Beach. Most spots the older members grew up around were replaced with electronic stores, restaurants, and gyms. Tourists took tours throughout the day, passing nearby surrounding areas as it added distaste to those who grew up there. This inspired the tight knit gang to hustle more, as they staked out rich pedestrians on a daily. They started committing more petty crimes, doing a lot of smash and grabs in Vespucci's night scene. They instilled fear in law abiding citizens nearby as they weren't used to crime at the level it was happening at. That didn't stop the tourist scene but still kept locals cautious, as they knew not to walk the streets at night. Around this time seen a emergence of a clique turned independent gang, called the Filthy Crips near Vitus Street. After long term disputes, the Filthy Crips combined with the Insanes, becoming the Filthy Insane Crips. They've adopted the Florida Marlins logo, using the "F" to identify as the Filthy Insanes. Overall the street gang are known to wear other colors from blue, as they looked to stand out from their neighbors. They also came to form a subset outside of Vespucci Beach called the 21st Street Young Gun Crips. Modern Day In present day, the Insane Crips mainly consist of members around the their mid teens to their mid-twenties. Despite their small numbers compared to past, they've still established themselves as a dominant presence in their surrounding areas. Waging mostly with the Rollin 20s Crips, Longo 13, and various sureno sets. The war between the Insanes and Rollins seen a spike in 2020. Along with that, the LSPD has been prosecuting members affiliated with the Insane Crips for numerous criminal offenses, with their ages being between 16-22 years old. This shows a different interest in recruitment compared to most street gangs, in search of membership in a older age bracket to join their street gang enterprise. The street gang still operates from the heart of their hood on 21st and Invention Court, stretching to 23rd and Cortes Street. They're known to loiter in the cuts around the upscale stores and restaurants, feared by the new locals towards their crimes towards unaccompanied vehicles throughout the day. As night approaches, tourists, joggers, and walkers empty the streets as the street gang normally loiters in high numbers in surrounding areas. New inhabitants soon realized the sounds outside at night weren't fireworks from Vespucci Beach. Some of the Insane Crips membership scattered out in modern time as gentrification pushed most out of the neighborhood. More then 80% of the neighborhood has changed since the past, kicking most of their members out as they found homes elsewhere throughout Vespucci Beach. 20% percent of the housing stayed the same or got refurbished down the line, allowing those receiving section 8 housing to only pay 30% of their rent. Vespucci Beach Housing Authority and long tenured family tenants allowed the Insane Crips to operate in Vespucci Beach despite the new found wealth around every block. This drove the young generation to more criminal activities as they grew sick of the high rise condos and newly built homes adjacent of their hood. The Insane Crips still identify as Trays(3x), beefing with known opposition, nowadays taking to social media to show their hatred to the other gang. Social Media has played a part in criminal activity and gang politics as a whole, furthering the loss of casualties every gang has experienced since. The Insane Crips gotten more elaborate in criminals activity in the recent years, thanks to the dead ends and alley ways nearby that the Insanes Crips benefitted from. The Insane Crips Gang stands as the largest predominately African-American street gang in Vespucci Beach. Allies & Rivals The E/S Insane Vespucci Crips are a large African American street gang mainly situated on the central side of Vespucci Beach. They identify with the Trays(3x) card, having an alliance with the Blacc Bandit Crips, Filthy Crip Gang, and most Hoover Criminal Gangs. The Insanes and the Hoovers shared an alliance for a long time, forming the Hoosane Alliance. Same goes with the N/S Naughty Nasty Gang Crips, as their members can be heard saying "2365", a representation of an alliance between the two gangs. They're cordial with the Asian Boyz Crips and Tiny Rascals Gang, despite the Insanes and Rascals younger generation feuding to a lower extent with head up fades. Knowing all that, bloodshed has never spilled the streets from the two street gangs. The Insane Crips used to share a close relationship and ally with the Rollin 20s Vespucci Crips, neighboring each other as both sides are bonded through family ties. However, during the late 1980's seen the alliance break apart, as egos and pride brought new enemies on both sides, leading to bloodshed. The Insane Crips are also known to beef or feud with the West Coast Crips, Mac Mafia Crips, Boulevard Mafia Crips, and all Neighborhood Crip gangs. They're also known to have a intense rivalry towards Rollin 0's Crips and Varrio Longo 13; the biggest Latino street gang in Vespucci Beach. Out of Character [This collective of individuals are striving to portray the E/S Insane Crips Gang, largest street gang in Long Beach. It's important to pay attention to detail, environment, and character development when you embark on roleplaying with us. I highly suggest doing some research before reaching out and expressing to join, it's important to conduct ourselves in a realistic portrayal and those who took that time to do so will be praised. You can reach out to my discord for any questions, comments or concerns on how to introduce yourself, complaints, or seek invite to the faction's discord. Those who show a high ambition in learning won't be push to the side. If you express a interest in adapting and roleplaying accordingly but are missing the knowledge, we'll help you out get adjusted. Most members seeking to join should be a minimum of 15 years old, though exceptions would be arranged based off certain circumstance. You can also reach out to the faction's discord link if you would like to join. This thread is subject to be updated.]
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  13. Dealership Tablet UI v. 0.01 Premise: I am a newbie with this kind of things, I am learning. This is just a preview, I will update this topic in order to show you the progress. LANGUAGES: HTML CSS JS PREVIEW ( v. 0.01 )
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  14. is that johann fischer? big fan bro
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  15. Interesting thread. I didn't expect to find a video guide.
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  16. no congrats for @Mitcholodolo from petahhhhh
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  19. grats old man
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  20. Epic fedora-wearing boomer.
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  21. Congratulations to everybody
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  22. My brothers AlmightyBounter and Marshall congratz men.
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  23. Brandon?! Tester?! Oh my gosh oh my gosh, congrats homie
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  24. i think they did a mistake
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  25. Grats every one!! GG bounter
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  26. 13/FEB/2022 Rule 05: Removed restriction for controller usage Server Rules Changelog | Los Santos Roleplay Wiki (ls-rp.com) Rule was changed, no discussions are needed.
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  27. This was unfortunate wording and pedo RP was never allowed. That being said, after consideration, we've decided to edit this archaic rule and disallow any of the actions mentioned in the rule, without exception or permissions. Acts of sexual violence and dangerous or illegal paraphilias are not something we're going to facilitate in the community, even as "roleplay". Punishment for breach of this rule is ban.
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  28. LS:RP, originally being an edit of the Godfather, was from it's core a complicated form of cops and robbers role play. While many players found different avenues to create and play as characters with varying success outside of this meta, there is no denying that the root of the game, the majority of the player base, and the systems created to facilitate role play were all centered around law enforcement and criminal factions respectively. If you're looking for success, I believe it's important to reconcile that the GTA RP landscape seems to've changed. While I won't explicitly criticize or promote the community in saying this: I find it funny when people rail against certain systems GTA:W uses, a frequent highlight being the lack of focus the overall community has on illegal factions. With what I've observed through admittedly a low amount of play (about ~100-150 hours), I think a hard pill that many of the old guard players refuse to swallow is that you are not the majority demographic anymore. While a good amount of LS:RP players had made the trip to GTA:W, I've noticed through Discord hopping and communicating with players that a majority of them stem from more social role playing games, many of which I'd say are hardly compatible with the LS:RP C&R format. GTA:W seems to deliberately cater to these players, and rightfully so. The expectation that illegal / old guard role players should be center stage is a remnant of the attitude of old LS:RP. Frankly put: I fully believe that in order to be competitive in the market, the former approach of leaving these players to their own devices simply is no longer possible. The largest takeaway I have from my theory is that players beget players. I don't think it's reasonable to expect LS:RP to be competitive in the market if the primary goal is to simply bring the old community into the new platform. The remaining veterans aren't going to make the switch if the player counts are glaringly in favor of the communities they're already in, and the opposite demo won't make the switch unless they're compelled with very good reasoning. In both cases, you'd be asking many players to abandon relationships with the server, factions, characters, other players, assets and potentially thousands of hours of progress and whatever else that progress may entail. I think it's become far too trendy to blindly criticize GTA:W. Don't get me wrong, I have the same problems with it that you do. That being said, I've been preaching for quite some time that, while yes I think true that the community objectively has some problems, simply dismissing every idea out of Nervous' head as bad is an overly elitist, unrealistic line of thinking. Truthfully, some of the scripts regarding businesses, dynamic item creation, map markers, and static info points are downright genius, and very literally go above and beyond facilitating role play, particularly for civilian role players. In short: how does LS:RP compete with other communities in this area, which has specifically been sidelined for years and which the community may be woefully underequipped to handle?
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  29. I believe they should be allowed, it's always good to have a choice then none at all. Ped skins do offer different types of assets such as being chubby or looking a certain way which is not offered in the GTA:O character creation, some people prefer them and I consider that as a benefit to the server, players choice.
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  30. what the game been missing
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  31. Haha hopefully have 1k posts soon
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